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Baloo's Bugle

September 2005 Cub Scout Roundtable Issue

Volume 12, Issue 2
October 2005 Theme

Theme: To The Rescue
Webelos: Citizen & Showman
  Tiger Cub
Activities

SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES

Emergency Preparedness Award

The Boy Scouts of America has joined with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to ensure the nation’s youth are prepared for any situation.  The United States Department of Homeland Security is supporting the Boy Scouts of America in the campaign to help citizens across the country prepare for emergencies of all kinds. The new initiative—Emergency Preparedness BSA—builds upon the organization’s well-known legacy of emergency and safety training. 

 “The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is pleased to partner with the Boy Scouts of America to promote preparedness for both youth and adults,” saidMichael Brown, undersecretary for emergency preparedness and response. “By continuing to build upon the foundation of the department’s Ready campaign, we will work together to explore additional ways to make emergency preparedness information available to Scouts and Scouters alike.”

Roy L. Williams, Chief Scout Executive of the Boy Scouts of America, said the initiative is the most recent in a long line of community service projects Scouts have undertaken in support of the nation.  “From its very inception, Scouting has taught our nation’s youth to do their best, to do their duty to God and country, and to be prepared,” said Williams. “The emergencies of today’s world demand more than ever that our young people and adults be trained to deal with many different situations, both as individuals and families.”


Tiger Cub Requirements

  • Complete Tiger Cub Achievement 3—Keeping Myself Healthy and Safe. This achievement covers a family fire plan and drill and what to do if separated from the family.
  • Complete Tiger Cub Elective 27—Emergency! This elective helps a Tiger Cub be ready for emergencies and dangerous situations and has him discuss a family emergency plan with his family.
  • With your parent or guardian's help, complete one of these three activities.
    • Take the American Red Cross First Aid for Children Today (FACT) course.
    • Join a safe kids program such as McGruff Child Identification, Internet Safety, or Safety at Home.
    • Show and tell your family household what you have learned about preparing for emergencies.

Wolf Cub Scout Requirements

  • Complete Wolf Cub Scout Achievement 9*—Be Safe at Home and on the Street. This is a check of your home to keep it safe.
  • Complete Wolf Cub Scout Elective 16*—Family Alert. This elective is about designing a plan for your home and family in case an emergency takes place.
  • With your parent or guardian's help, complete one of the following activities that you have not already completed for this award as a Tiger Cub:
    • Take American Red Cross Basic Aid Training (BAT) to learn emergency skills and care for choking, wounds, nose bleeds, falls, and animal bites. This course includes responses for fire safety, poisoning, water accidents, substance abuse, and more.
    • Make a presentation to your family on what you have learned about preparing for emergencies.
    • Join a Safe Kids program such as McGruff Child Identification program. Put on a training program for your family or den on stranger awareness, Internet safety, or safety at home.

* Achievement and elective numbers could change; the achievement or elective title determines what the requirement is.

Bear Cub Scout Requirements

  • Complete Bear Cub Scout Achievement 11*—Be Ready. The focus of this achievement is the best way to handle emergencies.
  • Make a small display or give a presentation for your family or den on what you have learned about preparing for emergencies.
  • With your parent or guardian's help, complete one of the following activities that you have not already completed for this award as a Tiger Cub or Wolf Cub Scout:
    • Take American Red Cross Basic Aid Training (BAT) to learn emergency skills and care for choking, wounds, nose bleeds, falls, and animal bites. This course includes responses for fire safety, poisoning, water accidents, substance abuse, and more..
    • Put together a family emergency kit for use in the home.
    • Organize a safe kids program such as McGruff Child Identification program. Put on a training program for your family or den on stranger awareness, Internet safety, or safety at home.

* Achievement and elective numbers could change; the achievement or elective title determines what the requirement is.

Webelos Scout Requirements

  1. Earn the Readyman activity badge from the community badge group.
  2. Build a family emergency kit, with an adult family member participating in the project.
  3. With your parent or guardian's help, complete one of the following that you have not already completed for this award as a Tiger Cub or Wolf or Bear Cub Scout:
    • Take a first aid course conducted by your local American Red Cross chapter.
    • Give a presentation to your den on preparing for emergencies.
    • Organize a training program for your Webelos den on stranger awareness, Internet safety, or safety at home.

Unit Volunteer Scouter Requirements

This award is available to all registered Scouters who serve a unit, including all leaders and committee members.

  1. Do any three of the following:
    • Develop an emergency preparedness program plan and kit for your home and be sure all family members know the plan.
    • Participate actively in preparing an emergency plan of action for your Scouting unit meeting place. (This includes all locations where you might have a meeting.)
    • Put together a unit emergency kit to be kept at your unit meeting location. (This includes all locations where you might have a meeting.)
    • Take a basic first aid/CPR course, or participate as an active volunteer in a community agency responsible for disaster preparedness.

Council/District Volunteer Scouter Requirements

  • Do any three of the following:
    • Develop an emergency preparedness program plan and kit for your home and be sure all family members know the plan.
    • Take a basic first aid/CPR course.
      Participate as an active volunteer in a community agency responsible for emergency disaster preparedness.
    • Participate actively in developing an emergency preparedness program for a council or district activity. Example: a camporee, Scouting show, fun day, etc.

When a member has fulfilled the requirements appropriate to his age/program segment, a completed application is submitted to the council. Upon approval, an Emergency Preparedness pin is awarded. The pin may be worn on civilian clothing or on the uniform, centered on the left pocket flap. The award may be earned more than once; for instance, as a young person advances through the ranks and is capable of more complex preparedness activities, but only one pin may be worn.  You can get the application at http://www.scouting.org/pubs/emergency/19-602.pdf

Boys' Life Reading Contest

Enter the 18th Boys' Life Reading Contest Now!

Write a one-page report titled "The Best Book I Read This Year" and enter it in the Boys' Life 2005 "Say Yes to Reading!" contest. 

The book can be fiction or nonfiction. But the report has to be in your own words—500 words tops. Enter in one of these three age categories: 8 years old and younger, 9 and 10 years old, or 11 years and older.

First-place winners in each age category will receive a $100 gift certificate good for any product in the Boy Scouts Official Retail Catalog. Second-place will receive a $75 gift certificate, and third-place a $50 certificate.

Everyone who enters will get a free patch like the green one above. (The patch is a temporary insignia, so it can be worn on the Boy Scout uniform shirt. Proudly display it there or anywhere!) In coming years, you'll have the opportunity to earn the other patches.

The contest is open to all Boys' Life readers. Be sure to include your name, address, age and grade on the entry. Send your report, along with a business-size, self-addressed, stamped envelope, to:

Boys' Life Reading Contest, S306
P.O. Box 152079
Irving, TX 75015-2079

For more details go to www.boyslife.org

Entries must be postmarked by Dec. 31, 2005.

The William D. Boyce New-Unit Organizer Award

Kommisioner Karl

William Boyce New-Unit Award square knot

The William D. Boyce New-Unit Organizer Award is to recognize volunteers who organize one or more traditional Scouting units after March 1, 2005.

The award is a square knot to be worn on the uniform above the left pocket.  The award has three colors, representing the three phases of our program – Cub Scouting, Boy Scouting, and Venturing.

The knot is earned by organizing one traditional unit.  This includes getting the unit leadership trained, putting in place a functioning committee, getting a unit commissioner assigned, and all paperwork is completed and processed including presenting the charter to the charter partner.  Only one volunteer may be recognized per new unit that is organized.  A program device is earned for each additional unit organized, allowing the award to recognize a volunteer for organizing up to four new units.

You can download a progress record and complete information on the BSA guidelines for organizing units at: 

http://www.scouting.org/relationships/04-515.pdf



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