U. S. Scouting Service Project at http://usscouts.org

BOY SCOUT
ADVANCEMENT
REQUIREMENT CHANGES

Effective: January 1, 2001

ussspdiv.gif (1704 bytes)

When there is a conflict between two published lists of requirements, such as the Requirements Book and a Merit Badge Pamphlet, the Requirements Book should be considered to be the controlling document, until a newer edition of the Requirements Book is issued, EXCEPT when the pamphlet has a later issue date.

BSA is in the process of updating ALL 118 merit badge books, with the goal of updating all of them within 4-5 years (a rate of around 25 per year). As new pamphlets are issued, when they contain new requirements, Scouts will have the option of starting with the new requirements as soon as the pamphlets are issued, or they may start work using the old requirements until the next edition of Boy Scout Requirements is issued. 

They will NOT be holding the publications up until January each year, just issuing them as they are completed (and old stocks exhausted, probably). Then in January, the Requirements Book will include all revisions to date.

The following Merit Badges had new pamphlets issued either at or subsequent to the 2001BSA National Jamboree, with new requirements:

Traffic Safety, Metalwork, Wood Carving.

In addition, a new FLY FISHING Merit Badge was field tested at the Jamboree, but the pamphlet and requirements are not available at this time.


COMPLETELY REPLACED (or EXTENSIVELY REWRITTEN)
MERIT BADGE REQUIREMENTS
(in the 2001 Requirements Book)

Aviation
Engineering
Lifesaving
Swimming

COMPLETELY REPLACED (or EXTENSIVELY REWRITTEN)
MERIT BADGE REQUIREMENTS
(Issued after the 2001 Requirements Book)

Metalwork
Traffic Safety
Wood Carving

REVISED MERIT BADGE REQUIREMENTS

Animal Science
Auto Mechanics
Stamp Collecting


Animal Science:

Requirement 3 was changed to read:

  1. Explain the major differences in digestive systems of ruminant and nonruminant animals.
    Explain the differences in feeds typically used for beef cattle and for dairy cows.

The first sentence of Requirement 4 was revised to read:

Tell how you would properly manage a cow, horse, sheep, goat, or hog, or a poultry flock, including adequate feeding.

Requirement 5 was changed to read:

  1. Tell about three career opportunities in animal science.

The following changes were made to requirement 6:

Under the BEEF CATTLE option, items (b) and (c) were changed and Item (d) added, as follows:

  1. Sketch a plan of a feedlot, forage and grain storage facilities, and loading chute for 30 or more fattening steers, or a corral plan with cutting and loading chutes for handling 50 or more beef cows and their calves at one time.

  2. Submit a sketch showing the principal wholesale and retail cuts of beef. Tell about the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) dual grading system of beef. Tell about the grades in each system.

  3. Define the following terms: bull, steer, bullock, cow, heifer, freemartin, heiferette, calf

Under the DAIRYING option, items (b), (c), and (d) were revised, a new item (e) was added and item (e) was renumbered to (f):

  1. Make a chart showing the ingredients in cows' milk or goat's milk. Chart the amount of each ingredient.

  2. Explain the requirements for producing Grade A milk. Tell how milk is pasteurized.

  3. Tell about the kinds of equipment and sanitation standards for dairy farms.

  4. Define the following terms: bull, cow, steer, heifer, springer, buck, doe, kid.

Under the HORSE option, items (b) and (c) were revised, and a new item (e) was added.  They read as follows:

  1. Tell the history of the horse and the benefits it has brought to people.

  2. Define the following terms: mare, stallion, gelding, foal, colt, filly; mustang, quarter horse, draft horse, pacer, trotter; pinto, calico, palomino, overo, tobiano.

  3. Outline the proper feeding of a horse doing light work. Explain why the amount and kind of feed will change according to the kind of horse and the work it does. Describe the symptoms of colic.

 Under the SHEEP option, items (b) thru (e) were replaced with the following:

  1. Select two breeds that would be appropriate for the production of crossbred market lambs in your region. Identify which breed the rams should be.

  2. Choose three breeds and offer a crossbreeding plan that would use the best characteristics of each breed for maximum sheep production efficiency.

  3. Visit a farm or ranch where sheep are raised. Tell about your visit, including the feeding program used. If you cannot visit a sheep farm or ranch, view a video from a breed association, or research the Internet for information on sheep production. Tell about your findings.

  4. Describe some differences between the production of pure-bred and commercial lambs.

  5. Define the following terms: wether, ewe, ram, lamb.

 Under the HOG option,  item (a) was revised, and a new item (d) was added.  They read as follows:

  1. Visit a farm where hogs are produced, or visit a packing plant handling hogs. Describe your visit. If you cannot visit a hog production unit or packing plant, view a video from a packer or processor. Tell about the video.

  2. Define the following terms: gilt, sow, barrow, boar.

Under the POULTRY option, item (a) was deleted, item (b) renumbered as (a) and revised, and new items (b) thru (d) added. The new requirements read as follows:

  1. Do ONE of the following:

    1. Manage an egg-producing flock for five months. Keep records of feed purchased, eggs sold, medication, vaccination, and mortality. Present records for review.

    2. Raise 20 chicks, poults, or ducklings. Keep records of feed intake, weight gains, medication, vaccination, and mortality. Present records for review. Kill and dress two birds.

    3. Visit a commercial layer or broiler chicken producer, or a turkey production unit. Tell about your visit. If you cannot visit a commercial poultry or egg farm, view a video from a poultry association or research the Internet for information on poultry production. Tell about your findings.

  2. Make a sketch of a layer house or broiler house showing nests, roosts, feeders, waterers, and means of ventilation. Explain how insulation, ventilation, temperature controls, automatic lights, and other environmental controls are used to protect birds from heat, cold, and bad weather.

  3. Tell about the grading of eggs. Tell how broilers (fryers) are graded. Describer the classes of chicken meat.

  4. Define the following terms: hen, rooster, chick, capon, tom, poult.


Auto Mechanics:

Minor editing changes were made to Requirements 1, 4(a)(3), and 4(c)(1).

Requirements 10 (b) and (c) were changed to read as follows:

    1. Explain the differences between disc and drum systems.

    2. Demonstrate checking conditions on a vehicle brake system.
      After checking make recommendations for repairs (if necessary).


Aviation:

The requirements have been completely revised and read as follows.  Many of the previous requirements were retained, but revised slightly or rearranged, and new material was added.

  1. Do the following:

    1. Define "aircraft." Describe some kinds and uses of aircraft today. Explain the operation of piston, turboprop, and jet engines.

    2. Point out on a model airplane the forces that act on an airplane in flight.

    3. Explain how an airfoil generates lift, how the primary control surfaces (ailerons, elevators, and rudder) affect the airplane’s attitude, and how a propeller produces thrust.

    4. Demonstrate how the control surfaces of an airplane are used for takeoff, straight climb, level turn, climbing turn, descending turn, straight descent, and landing.

    5. Explain the following: the recreational pilot and the private pilot certificates; the instrument rating.

    6. Find out what job opportunities there are in aviation. Describe the qualifications and working conditions of one job in which you are interested. Tell what it offers for reaching your goal in life.

  2. Do TWO of the following:

    1. Take a flight in an aircraft. Record the date, place, type of aircraft, and duration of flight, and report on your impressions of the flight.

    2. Visit an airport. After the visit, report on how the facilities are used, how runways are numbered, and how runways are determined to be "active."

    3. Visit a Federal Aviation Administration facility—a control tower, terminal radar control facility, air route traffic control center, flight service station, or Flight Standards District Office. (Phone directory listings are under U.S. Government Offices, Transportation Department, Federal Aviation Administration. Call in advance.) Report on the operation and your impressions of the facility.

    4. Visit an aviation museum or attend an air show. Report on your impressions of the museum or show.

    5. Explain the purposes and functions of the various instruments found in a typical single-engine aircraft: attitude indicator, heading indicator, altimeter, airspeed indicator, turn and bank indicator, vertical speed indicator, compass, navigation (GPS and VOR) and communication radios, tachometer, oil pressure gauge, and oil temperature gauge.

    6. Visit an aircraft maintenance shop. Interview a technician and report on his/her ideas about aircraft maintenance.

    7. Create an original poster of an aircraft instrument panel. Include and identify the instruments and radios discussed in requirement 2e.

  3. Do TWO of the following:

    1. Interview a professional or military pilot. Report on what you learned.

    2. Interview a flight attendant. Report on what you learned.

    3. Interview a certified flight instructor. Report on what you learned.

    4. Under supervision, perform a preflight inspection of a light airplane.

    5. Obtain and learn how to read an aeronautical chart. Measure a true course on the chart. Correct it for magnetic variation, compass deviation, and wind drift. Arrive at a compass heading.

    6. Using one of many flight simulator software packages available for computers, "fly" the course and heading you established in requirement 3e or another course you have plotted.

    7. On a map, mark a route for an imaginary airline trip to at least three foreign countries. Start from the commercial airport nearest your home. From timetables (obtained from agents or online from a computer), decide when you will get to and leave from all connecting points.

    8. Build and fly a fuel-driven model airplane. Describe safety rules for building and flying model airplanes Tell safety rules for use of glue, paint, dope, plastics, and fuel.

    9. Assemble a poster (or album) of original photographs taken while accomplishing the requirements.


Engineering:

The requirements have been completely revised and read as follows.  Some of the previous requirements were retained, but revised slightly or rearranged, and new material was added.

  1. Select some manufactured item in your home (such as a toy or an appliance) and, under adult supervision and with the approval of your counselor, investigate how and why it works as it does. Find out what sort of engineering activities were needed to create it. Discuss with your counselor what you learned and how you got the information.

  2. Select an engineering achievement that has had a major impact on society. Use the resources available to you to research it. Tell your counselor about the engineer(s) who made it possible, the special obstacles they had to overcome, and how this achievement has influenced the world today.

  3. Explain the work of six types of engineers. Pick two of the six and explain how their work is related.

  4. Visit with an engineer (who may be your counselor or parent) and do the following:

    1. Discuss the work this engineer does and the tools the engineer uses.

    2. Discuss with the engineer a current project and the engineer’s particular role in it.

    3. Find out how the engineer’s work is done and how results are achieved.

    4. Ask to see the reports that the engineer writes concerning the project.

    5. Discuss with your counselor what you learned about engineering from this visit.

  5. Do ONE of the following:

    1. Use the engineering-systems approach to make step by step plans for your next campout. List alternative ideas for such items as program schedule, campsites, transportation, and costs. Tell why you made the choices you did and what improvements were made.

    2. Make an original design for a piece of patrol equipment. Use the engineering-systems approach to help you decide how it should work and look. Draw plans for it. Show the plans to your counselor, explain why you designed it the way you did, and explain how you would make it.

  6. Do TWO of the following:

    1. Transforming motion. Using common material or a construction set, make a simple model that will demonstrate transforming motion. How does this make use of basic mechanical concepts like levers and inclined planes? Describe an example where this mechanism is used in a real product.

    2. Using electricity. Make a list of 10 electrical appliances in your home. Find out approximately how much electricity each uses in one month. Learn how to find out the amount and cost of electricity used in your home during periods of light and heavy use. List five ways to conserve electricity.

    3. Using materials. Do experiments to show the differences in strength and heat conductivity in wood, plastic, and metal. Discuss with your counselor what you have learned.

    4. Converting energy. Do an experiment to show how mechanical, heat, chemical, solar, and/or electrical energy may be converted from one or more types of energy to another. Explain your results. Describe to your counselor what energy is and how energy is converted and used in your surroundings.

    5. Moving people. Find out the different ways people in your community get to work. Make a study of traffic flow (number of vehicles and relative speed) in both heavy and light traffic periods. Discuss with your counselor what might be improved to make it easier for people in your community to get where they need to go.

    6. Science fair. Build an engineering project for a science or engineering fair or similar competition, and enter it. (This requirement may be met by participation on an engineering competition project team.) Discuss with your counselor what your project demonstrates and what kind of questions visitors to the fair asked you about it. How well were you able to answer their questions.

  7. Find out what high school courses you need to take to be admitted to an engineering college. Find out what other subjects would be helpful in preparing for an engineering career.

  8. Explain what it means for an engineer to be a registered Professional Engineer (P.E.). In what types of engineering work is registration most important?

  9. Study the Engineer’s Code of Ethics Explain how this is like the Scout Oath and Scout Law.


Lifesaving:

 The requirements have been completely revised and read as follows.  Some of the previous requirements were retained, but revised slightly or rearranged, and new material was added. 

Note that these changes removed the specific requirement for earning Swimming Merit Badge as a prerequisite for this badge.

  1. Before doing requirements 2 through 15

    1. Complete Second Class requirements 7a through 7c and First Class requirements 9a through 9d.

      • Second Class requirements 7a through 7c

        1. Tell what precautions must be taken for a safe swim.

        2. Demonstrate your ability to jump feetfirst into water over your head in depth, level off and swim 25 feet on the surface, stop, turn sharply, resume swimming, then return to your starting place.

        3. Demonstrate water rescue methods by reaching with your arm or leg, reaching with a suitable object, and by throwing lines and objects. Explain why swimming rescues should not be attempted when a reaching or throwing rescue is possible, and explain why and how a rescue swimmer should avoid contact with the victim.

      • First Class requirements 9a through 9d:

        1. Tell what precautions should be taken for a safe trip afloat.

        2. Successfully complete the BSA swimmer test.

        3. Demonstrate survival skills by leaping into deep water wearing clothes (shoes, socks, swim trunks, long pants, belt, and long-sleeved shirt). Remove shoes and socks, inflate the shirt, and show that you can float using the shirt for support. Swim 50 feet using the inflated pants for support, then show how to reinflate the pants while using them for support.

        4. With a helper and a practice victim, show a line rescue both as tender and as rescuer. (The practice victim should be approximately 30 feet from shore in deep water).

    2. Swim continuously for 400 yards using each of the following strokes in a strong manner for at least 50 continuous yards: front crawl, sidestroke, breaststroke, and elementary backstroke.

  2. Explain the following:

    1. Common drowning situations and how to prevent them.

    2. How to identify persons in the water who need assistance.

    3. The order of methods in water rescue.

    4. How rescue techniques vary depending on the setting and the condition of the person needing assistance.

    5. Situations for which in-water rescues should not be undertaken.

  3. Demonstrate "reaching" rescues using various items such as arms, legs, towels, shirts, paddles, and poles.

  4. Demonstrate "throwing" rescues using various items such as lines, ring buoys, rescue bags, and free-floating supports. Successfully place at least one such aid within reach of a practice victim 25 feet from shore.

  5. Show or explain the use of rowboats, canoes, and other small craft in performing rescues.

  6. List various items that can be used as rescue aids in a noncontact swimming rescue. Explain why buoyant aids are preferred.

  7. Perform the following equipment-based rescues for a conscious practice subject 30 feet from shore. Use a correct entry and a strong approach stroke. Speak to the subject to determine his condition and to provide instructions and encouragement.

    1. Present a rescue tube to the subject, release it, and escort the victim to safety.

    2. Present a rescue tube to the subject and use it to tow the victim to safety.

    3. Present a buoyant aid other than a rescue tube to the subject, release it, and escort the victim to safety.

    4. Present a buoyant aid other than a rescue tube to the subject and use it to tow the victim to safety.

    5. Remove street clothes in 20 seconds or less and use a non-buoyant aid, such as a shirt or towel, to tow the subject to safety. Explain when it is appropriate to remove heavy clothing before attempting a swimming rescue.

  8. Explain the importance of avoiding contact with an active victim and describe lead-and-wait tactics.

  9. Perform the following nonequipment rescues for a conscious practice subject 30 feet from shore. Begin in the water from a position near the subject. Speak to the subject to determine his condition and to provide instructions and encouragement.

    1. Provide a swim-along assist for a calm, responsive, tired swimmer moving with a weak forward stroke.

    2. Perform an armpit tow for a calm, responsive, tired swimmer resting with a back float.

    3. Perform a cross-chest carry for an exhausted, passive victim who does not respond to instructions to aid himself.

  10. In deep water, show how to escape from a victim’s grasp on your wrist. Repeat for front and rear holds about the head and shoulders.

  11. Perform the following rescues for an unconscious practice subject at or near the surface 30 feet from shore. Use a proper entry and strong approach stroke. Speak to the subject to determine his condition before making contact. Remove the victim from the water, with assistance if needed, and position for CPR.

    1. Perform an equipment assist using a buoyant aid.

    2. Perform a front approach and wrist tow.

    3. Perform a rear approach and armpit tow.

  12. Describe how to respond if a victim submerges before being reached by a rescuer, and do the following:

    1. Recover a 10-pound weight in 8 to 10 feet of water using a feetfirst surface dive.

    2. Repeat using a headfirst surface dive.

  13. Demonstrate knowledge of resuscitation procedures:

    1. Describe how to recognize the need for rescue breathing and CPR.

    2. Demonstrate proper CPR technique for at least 3 minutes using a mannequin designed to simulate ventilations and compressions.

  14. Demonstrate management of a spinal injury

    1. Explain the signs and symptoms of a spinal injury

    2. Support a face up victim in calm, shallow water.

    3. Turn a subject from a facedown to a faceup position while maintaining support.

  15. Show that you know first aid for other injuries or illnesses that could occur while swimming or boating, including hypothermia, heat reactions, muscle cramps, sunburn, stings, and hyperventilation.

Note: Alternative requirements for the Second Class and First Class ranks are available for Scouts with physical or mental disabilities if they meet the criteria listed on page 13 of the Boy Scout Requirements book, No. 33215D.


Metalwork

The requirements have been completely revised and read as follows:

  1. Read the safety rules listed in the Metalwork merit badge pamphlet. Describe to your counselor how to be safe while working with metal. Because this merit badge offers four options, show your counselor which additional safety rules apply to the discipline you choose and discuss them with your counselor.
  2. Do the following:
    1. Define the term native metal.
    2. Define the term malleable.
    3. Define tie term metallurgy.
    4. Define the term alloy.
    5. Name two nonferrous alloys used by pre-Iron Age metalworkers, and name the metals that are combined to form these alloys.
    6. Explain the term ferrous, and name three ferrous alloys used by modern metalworkers.
    7. Describe how to work–harden a metal.
    8. Describe how to anneal a non-ferrous and a ferrous metal.
  3. Do the following:
    1. Put a 45-degree bend in a small piece of unworked 26– or 28–gauge sheet brass or sheet copper. Note the amount of effort that is required to overcome the yield point in this unworked piece of metal.
    2. Work-harden another piece of the same sheet brass or sheet copper. and then put a 45-degree bend in it. Note tie amount of effort that is required to overcome the yield point.
    3. Soften the same bent, work hardened piece by annealing it and then try to remove the 45–degree bend. Note the amount of effort that is required to overcome the yield point.
    4. Join two small pieces of scrap metal using a hammered rivet. Repeat the process using a pop rivet.
    5. Using a flatlock seam, join two pieces of scrap metal together with either lead-free solder or silver solder.
    6. Make a temper color index from a flat piece of steel. Using hand tools, make and temper a center punch of medium-carbon or high-carbon steel.
    7. Using metal cans, practice using the basic metalworking tools and techniques by making at least two tasteful objects that require cutting, bending, and edging.
  4. Do ONE of the following:
    1. Visit an experienced sheet metal mechanic, tinsmith, coppersmith, jeweler, founder or a blacksmith at his or her workshop. You may select a skilled hobbyist or a professional. Ask permission to see the tools used and to examine the examples of the work made at the shop. Inquire about the level of education required to become an apprentice craftsman.
    2. If you have (or your counselor has) access to the internet, explore metalworking occupations by conducting a Web search. With your counselor’s help and guidance, find at least five metalworking–related Web sites. Print a copy of the web pages and discuss them with your counselor.
    When conducting your Web search, use keywords such as metallurgy, metalwork, spinning metal, metal fabrication, steel fabrication, aluminum fabrication, casting metal, pattern making, welding, forge welding, blacksmith, _____ Blacksmith Association of America, farrier, brazing, goldsmith, machinist, or sheet metal mechanic.
  5. After completing the first three requirements, complete at least ONE of the options listed below.
    1. Option 1 – Sheet Metal Mechanic / Tinsmith
      1. Name and describe ate use of the basic sheet metal working tools.
      2. Create a reasonably accurate sketch of two tasteful objects to make from sheet metal. Include each component's dimensions on your sketch.
      3. Using patterns provided either by your counselor or made by you, make at least two tasteful objects out of 24- or 26–gauge sheet metal. Use a metal that is appropriate to the object’s ultimate purpose.
        1. Both objects must be constructed using culling, bending, edging, and either soldering or braising
        2. One object must include at least one riveted component
        3. If you do not make your objects from zinc-plated sheet steel, preserve your work from oxidation.
    2. Option 2 - Silversmith
      1. Name and describe the use of the basic tools used by a silversmith.
      2. Create a reasonably accurate hand-drawn sketch of two tasteful objects to make from sheet silver. Include each component's dimensions on your sketch.
      3. Using patterns provided either by your counselor or made by you, make at least two tasteful objects out of 18- or 20–gauge sheet Copper. If you have prior silversmithing experience, you may substitute sterling silver, nickel silver, or lead free pewter.
        1. At least one objectt must include a sawed component you have made yourself.
        2. At least one object must include a sunken part you have made yourself.
        3. Both objects must include a soldered joint.
        4. Clean and polish your objects.
    3. Option 3 – Founder
      1. Name and describe the use of the basic parts of a two–piece mold. Name at least three different types of molds.
      2. Create a reasonably accurate sketch of two tasteful objects to cast in metal. Include the height, width, and length on the sketch.
      3. Do the following:
        1. Using a pattern provided by your counselor and another one made by yourself, make two molds. Position the pouring gates and vents yourself. Do not use copyrighted materials as patterns.
        2. Make a casting using a mold provided by your counselor and make a casting using the mold you have made. Use lead free pewter when casting each mold.
    4. Option 4 - Blacksmith
      1. Name and tell the use of the basic tools used by a blacksmith.
      2. Make a reasonably accurate sketch of two tasteful objects to hot-forge. Include each component’s dimensions on your sketch.
      3. Using low–carbon steel at least inch thick, perform the following exercises:
        1. Draw out by forging a taper.
        2. Use the horn of the anvil by forging a U-shaped bend.
        3. Twist steel by placing a decorative twist in a piece of square steel.
        4. Use the edge of the anvil to bend metal by forging an L–shaped bend.
      4. Using low-carbon steel at least inch thick, make at least two tasteful objects that require hot-forging.
        1. Include a decorative twist on one object.
        2. Include a hammer-riveted joint in one object.
      5. Preserve your work from oxidation.

Stamp Collecting:

Very Minor changes were made to Requirements 5(c) and 8(d) which now read:

  1. (c) Magnifiers

  2. (d) A collection of 75 or more different stamps on a single topic. (Some interesting topics are Scouting, birds, insects, the Olympics, sports, flowers, animals, ships, Christmas, trains, famous people, space, and medicine). Stamps may be from different countries.


Swimming:

The requirements have been completely revised and read as follows.  Some of the previous requirements were retained, but revised slightly or rearranged, and new material was added.

  1. Show that you know first aid for injuries or illnesses that could occur while swimming, including hypothermia, heat reactions, muscle cramps, sunburn, stings, cuts and scrapes, spinal injuries, and hyperventilation.

  2. Do the following:

    1. Identify the conditions that must exist before performing CPR on a person. Explain how such conditions are recognized.

    2. Demonstrate proper technique for performing CPR using a training device approved by your counselor.

  3. Before doing the following requirements, successfully complete Second Class requirements 7a through 7c and First Class requirements 9a through 9d

    • Second Class requirements 7a through 7c

      1. Tell what precautions must be taken for a safe swim.

      2. Demonstrate your ability to jump feetfirst into water over your head in depth, level off and swim 25 feet on the surface, stop, turn sharply, resume swimming, then return to your starting place.

      3. Demonstrate water rescue methods by reaching with your arm or leg, reaching with a suitable object, and by throwing lines and objects. Explain why swimming rescues should not be attempted when a reaching or throwing rescue is possible, and explain why and how a rescue swimmer should avoid contact with the victim.

    • First Class requirements 9a through 9d:

      1. Tell what precautions should be taken for a safe trip afloat.

      2. Successfully complete the BSA swimmer test.

      3. Demonstrate survival skills by leaping into deep water wearing clothes (shoes, socks, swim trunks, long pants, belt, and long-sleeved shirt). Remove shoes and socks, inflate the shirt, and show that you can float using the shirt for support. Swim 50 feet using the inflated pants for support, then show how to reinflate the pants while using them for support.

      4. With a helper and a practice victim, show a line rescue both as tender and as rescuer. (The practice victim should be approximately 30 feet from shore in deep water).

  4. Swim continuously for 150 yards using the following strokes in good form and in a strong manner: front crawl or trudgen for 25 yards, back crawl for 25 yards, sidestroke for 25 yards, breaststroke for 25 yards, and elementary backstroke for 50 yards.

  5. Do the following:

    1. Float faceup in a resting position for at least one minute.

    2. Demonstrate survival floating for at least five minutes.

    3. While wearing a properly fitted personal floatation device (PFD), demonstrate the HELP and huddle positions. Explain their purposes.

    4. Explain why swimming or survival floating will hasten the onset of hypothermia in cold water.

  6. In water over your head, but not to exceed 10 feet, do each of the following:

    1. Use the feetfirst method of surface diving and bring an object up from the bottom.

    2. Do a headfirst surface dive, pike, or tuck, and bring the object up again.

    3. Do a headfirst surface dive to a depth of at least 5 feet and swim underwater for three strokes. Come to the surface, take a breath, and repeat the sequence twice.

  7. Do the following:

    1. Demonstrate selection and fit of mask, snorkel, and fins; discuss safety in both pool and open-water snorkeling.

    2. Demonstrate proper use of mask, snorkel, and fins for underwater search and rescue.

    3. Describe the sport of scuba diving, and demonstrate your knowledge of BSA policies and procedures relating to this sport.

  8. In water at least 8 feet deep, show a headfirst dive from a dock or pool deck. Show a long shallow dive, also from the dock or pool deck. If a low board (not to exceed 40 inches above water at least 9 feet deep) is available, show a plain front dive.

  9. Demonstrate the following competitive swimming skills:

    1. Racing dive from a pool edge.

    2. Racing turns for both the front crawl and back crawl

    3. Racing form for 25 yards on one competitive stroke (front crawl, back crawl, breaststroke, or butterfly).

  10. Do the following:

    1. Explain the health benefits of regular aerobic exercise, and explain why many people today do not get enough of the beneficial kinds of exercise.

    2. Discuss why swimming is favored as both a fitness and a therapeutic exercise.

    3. Write a plan for a swimming exercise program that will promote aerobic/vascular fitness, strength and muscle tone, body flexibility, and weight control for a person of Scout age. Identify resources and facilities available in your home community that would be needed for such a program.

    4. Discuss with your counselor the incentives and obstacles for adherence to the fitness program you created in requirement 10c. Explain the unique benefits that could be gained from this program, and discuss how personal health awareness and self discipline would relate to your willingness and ability to pursue such a program.

  11. Assist with instruction in basic swimming skills under the direction of a qualified swimming instructor in two or more teaching sessions for a total of three hours. The instruction may be at either the nonswimmer or beginner level in summer camp, unit program, or any other organized program in your community. Assist with demonstrations, skill explanations, and individual coaching.


Traffic Safety

The requirements have been completely revised and read as follows.  Some of the previous requirements were retained, but revised slightly or rearranged, and new material was added.

  1. Do the following:

    1. Make a scrapbook containing 10 newspaper articles about serious traffic crashes. Prepare a summary table of facts in the articles indicating the number of people injured, the number killed, type of crash (single vehicle, head-on collision, etc.), time of occurrence, age of the driver, whether alcohol or drugs were involved, use of safety belts, and any other factors that were reported to have contributed to the crash (weather conditions, fatigue, construction, etc.). Discuss how these crashes could have been prevented.

    2. Describe how alcohol affects the human body and why this is a problem for safely driving a motor vehicle. Research the legal blood alcohol concentration in your state and the consequences for driving while intoxicated.

    3. Describe at least four factors to be considered when an engineer designs a road or highway. Explain how roadside hazards and road conditions contribute to the occurrence and seriousness of traffic crashes.

    4. Explain why a driver who is fatigued should not operate a motor vehicle. Describe how volunteer drivers can plan to be alert when transporting Scouting participants.

  2. Do the following:

    1. Identify the different types of occupant restraint systems used in motor vehicles. Describe how they work and their purpose for safety. Demonstrate how to properly wear lap and shoulder belts. Explain why it is important for drivers and passengers to wear safety belts at all times.

    2. List five safety features found in motor vehicles besides occupant restraint systems. Describe each feature, how each works, and how each contributes to safety.

  3. Do the following to show your knowledge of car care for safety maintenance:

    1. Using your family car or another vehicle, demonstrate that all lights and lighting systems in the vehicle are working. Describe the function and explain why each type of light is important to safe driving.

    2. Using your family car or another vehicle, demonstrate how to check tire pressure and identify the correct tire pressure for the vehicle. Explain why proper tire pressure is important to safe driving.

    3. Demonstrate a method to check for adequate tire tread. Explain why proper tread is important to safe driving.

    4. Demonstrate with a smear-and-clear test if the windshield wiper blades will clear the windshield completely or need to be replaced. Describe instances in good and bad weather when windshield washers are important to safe driving.

  4. Do the following:

    1. In a location away from traffic hazards, measure with a tape measure - not in a car - and mark off with stakes the distance that a car will travel during the time needed for decision and reaction, and the braking distances necessary to stop a car traveling 30, 50, and 70 miles per hour on dry, level pavement. Discuss how environmental factors such as bad weather and road conditions will affect the distance.

    2. Demonstrate the difference in nighttime visibility between a properly lit bicycle and rider (or a pedestrian) wearing reflective material and a bicycle and rider with no lights (or a pedestrian) dressed in dark clothing, without reflective material.

    3. Make a chart of standard traffic signs. Explain how color and shape are used to help road users recognize and understand the information presented. Explain the purpose of different types of sign: signals, and pavement markings.

    4. Describe at least three examples of traffic laws that apply to drivers of motor vehicles and that bicyclists must also obey.

  5. Do ONE of the following:

    1. Interview a traffic law enforcement officer in your community to identify what three traffic safety problems the officer is most concerned about. Discuss with your merit badge counselor possible ways to solve one of those problems.

    2. Initiate and organize an activity to demonstrate the importance of traffic safety. Activities could include making a traffic safety presentation before a school assembly, to classes of younger students, or to another large group of people; having a staged demonstration of the consequences of a crash, working with the police and paramedics; organizing a presentation to the students of your school by an emergency room doctor and/or nurse to describe their experiences with motor vehicle crash victims; organizing a clinic to demonstrate safe bicycle riding and helmet use.

    3. Accompanied by an adult, pick a safe place to observe traffic at a controlled intersection (traffic signal or stop sign) and survey (1) such violations as running a red light or stop sign; or (2) seat belt usage. Count the number of violations or number of drivers not wearing a seat belt. Record in general terms if the driver was young/old, male/ female. Discuss the findings with your merit badge counselor.

    4. Based on what you have learned so far, develop a checklist for a safe trip. Share the checklist with your merit badge counselor, and use the checklist whenever your family makes a vehicle trip. Include on the list the responsibilities of the driver and the passengers for before and during the trip.


Wood Carving

The requirements have been completely revised and read as follows.  Some of the previous requirements were retained, but revised slightly or rearranged, and new material was added.

  1. Show that you know first aid for injuries or illnesses that could occur while wood carving, including minor cuts and scratches and splinters.
  2. Do the following:
    1. Earn the Totin' Chip recognition.
    2. Discuss with your merit badge counselor your understanding of the Safety Checklist for Carving.
  3. Do the following:
    1. Explain to your counselor, orally or in writing, the care and use of five types of tools that you may use in a carving project.
    2. Tell your counselor how to care for and use several types of sharpening devices, then demonstrate that you know how to use these devices.
  4. Using a piece of scrap wood or a project on which you are working, show your merit badge counselor that you know how to do the following:
    1. Paring cut
    2. Basic cut and push cut
    3. Score line
    4. Stop cut
  5. Tell why different woods are used for different projects. Explain why you chose the type of wood you did for your projects in requirements 6 and 7.
  6. Plan your own or select a project from this merit badge pamphlet and complete a simple carving in the round.
  7. Complete a simple low-relief OR a chip carving project.

This analysis was prepared as a service to Scouts and Scouters nationwide
from information provided by
Mark Elias
Detroit Michigan

The information was edited, rearranged, and converted to HTML by:
Paul S. Wolf
Advancement Webmaster, US Scouting Service Project, Inc.

Copies may be freely distributed, so long as the source is acknowledged.


Page updated on: September 13, 2007

clear.gif
Materials found at the U. S. Scouting Service Project, Inc. Website 1997-2007 may be reproduced and used locally by Scouting volunteers for training purposes consistent with the programs of the Boy Scouts of America (BSA) [Links to BSA Sites] or other Scouting and Guiding Organizations. No material found here may be used or reproduced for electronic redistribution or commercial or other non-Scouting purposes without the express permission of the U. S. Scouting Service Project, Inc. (USSSP) or other copyright holders. USSSP is not affiliated with BSA and does not speak on behalf of BSA. Opinions expressed on these web pages are those of the web authors.

The U.S. Scouting Service Project is maintained by the Project Team. Look at our Web Stats. Please use one of our Contact Forms to communicate with us. All holdings subject to this Disclaimer. The USSSP is Proud to be hosted by Data393.com.

 

 
SUPPORT
THIS
WEBSITE

Support the US Scouting Service Project Websites with your donation. With your help we can continue to serve the Scouting Community.
The US Scouting Service Project, Inc. is a Not-for Profit Corporation chartered in the State of Missouri. The IRS has not recognized the USSSP as a 501(c)(3) organization, so donations may not be tax deductible.

To donate, click on the icon below.

Visit Our Trading Post