Baloo's Bugle

September 2008 Cub Scout Roundtable Issue

Volume 15, Issue 2
October 2008 Theme

Theme: Adventures in Books
Webelos: Citizen and Showman
Tiger Cub
Achievement 5

ADVANCEMENT & RECOGNITION CEREMONIES

DEN LEADER INDUCTION

Heart of America Council

CM:    What is leadership? It is a process by which a person influences others. In Cub Scouting, leadership is the ability to accomplish the Cub Scout program in an efficient, safe and effective manner.

CC:     Pack ______ is ready for the coming year.  Many able people have volunteered as Den Leaders for next year.

CA:     Would our new leaders please come forward as they are called.  (Call out name and position)

CC:     The Tiger Den Leader, Cub Scout Den Leader and Webelos Leader occupy unique and essential places in Cub Scouting. They fill a particular need for boys of Cub Scout age. They are indispensable leaders in the operation of our Pack.

CM:    Thank you for volunteering.  I will now read you the Den Leaders Creed.  Please respond with "I will."

            Will you promise to:

·         Show interest and concern for all boys in your Den?

·         Be responsible for the organization and operation of your Den?

·         Attend Pack leader meetings and Pack meetings?

·         Work with the parents of your Den so they will have the opportunity to share in the fun of Cub Scouting?

·         Observe the policies of the Boy Scouts of America?

·         Wearing the leader uniform not only identifies you as a very important member of the Boy Scouts of America, but it also sets a good example for the boys in your Den. Will you wear it with pride?

CC:     I would like to welcome each of you as new leaders in our Pack and present you with the badge of office and a copy of the Cub Scout Leader Book.

CA:     Congratulations and good Scouting! (Lead Cheer)

Adventures In Reading - Advancement Ideas

Sam Houston Area Council

Book of Awards

ü  Create a large book (lap size or bigger) out of poster board.

ü  On each “page” attach an award. You could even write a few sentences about the Cub Scout receiving that award on each page.

ü  The parents could come up and remove the award from the page and then award it to their Cub Scout.


 

Award Books

ü  At a thrift or Goodwill type store, find inexpensive books that would interest boys in your pack.

ü  Attach each boy’s awards inside the book (where possible)

ü  Award the book with the rank advancement, arrow points or belt loops/pins.

Books Advancement Ceremony

Capital Area Council

Have several books on display (some inexpensive ones that can be given away with advancement badges might be good).  Attach the badges to the books, or hide them in the pages of the book.  Say something about each award and the book it is with: for example: “Here we have the “Magic School Bus” - Did you know that Bear Cub Scouts are encouraged to learn to do magic tricks.  Or: Here’s a book that celebrates having healthy bodies (a book about sports would be good here).  A Wolf Rank requirement for Cub Scouts is to learn about how to be and stay healthy, and how to do physical feats of skill that will help them to grow strong and healthy.

Cub Scouting’s Seeds

Capital Area Council

Did your pack emphasize folklore this month, then this might be a good ceremony!  Or maybe you will want to use this one in November for Seeds of Kindness!!!

Personnel and Equipment:

Cubmaster (CM) and Assistant Cubmaster (CA)

Sack labeled “Johnny Cub Scout Seed” with advancement awards inside.

Ceremony:

CM:    Most of the heroes of American Folklore were fictional people.  They were born around the campfire in the 19th century when storytelling was like TV is today - the main entertainment of the people.

CA:     But a few of them were real.  And you can read about them in books.  One of these real people was Johnny Appleseed, who wandered through Ohio and Indiana for 40 years after the American Revolution planing apple orchards.  For generations afterward, those trees helped feed people.

CM:    The badges we’re awarding tonight are like those seeds.  They are symbols of growth for our Cub Scouts, who are themselves growing straight and tall like Johnny Appleseed’s trees.  And like those tress, our Cub Scouts will help other people.  (Take badges from sack and give them to parents to pin on boys’ shirts.)

You could attach seed packets to badges as a reminder that Cub Scouting helps a boy grow.  And that Cub Scouting plants the seeds of good citizenship in boys.


 

Other Advancement Ideas

Capital Area Council

ü  Use any props that would remind Cub Scouts of characters or places in books they are familiar with, and tailor the dialogue to fit the book and Cub Scouting.

ü  Using a favorite book about baseball, set up a “mini ball diamond” and have the boys “field” their awards as you “bat” them to them using a nerf ball, etc. 

ü  Or how about a piñata - Tie that to a book about Mexico. 

ü  Use stuffed animals for a book about farms or zoos. 

The options are innumerable - the only limits are your imagination and your library!

Here are some ceremonies that SNJC suggested for use depending on the books your group emphasized.  CD

American Folklore

Southern NJ Council

Props:            Five candles in holder, each candle a different length.

Personnel: - Cubmaster (CM), Assistant Cubmaster (CA)

CM:   Our history is filled not only with the tall tales of American Folklore, but also with the true deeds of some very brave men who explored, fought and in some cases died, to extend the frontiers of our country. Men like Davy Crockett, Daniel Boone, Kit Carson, Lewis and Clark, Buffalo Bill Cody, and many more.

CA:    The Scouting trail is much like the trail these famous men followed and so, at this time, we will recognize those Cubs in our Pack who have advanced along this trail. As I call your names, please come forward with your Parents. (Call names)

CM:   As you Cubs can see, the candles get taller as you advance. This represents the additional skills that you must learn as you earn each higher rank.

            (Light Shortest Candle). The Bobcat is the start of the trail and starts the new Cub Scout exploring the path.

CA:    (Light next candle.) The Tiger is the first step up from Bobcat where working with your Adult Partner you complete five Achievements. 

CM     (Light next candle.) The Wolf is a big step forward completing 12 Achievements

CA:    (Light the next candle) Earning your Bear takes more skill as you choose the 12 Achievements to complete from the 24 in the Big Bear Book.

CM:   Finally, at last, (light the tallest candle) you become a Webelos Scout, and earn your Webelos badge and the highest rank, the Arrow of Light.

CA:    And so with the spirit of the great explorers, folklore heroes, and frontiersmen to guide you, may you continue to climb the Scouting Trail.

CM and CA Present awards by Den
 and congratulate Cubs and parents.

CM:   (and/or CM) Lead Cheer(s) - One for each rank as it is presented would be great.  Every boy deserves individual recognition.

HEROES IN BOOKS

Heart of America Council

This could easily be made into an Opening or Closing CD

Cubmaster:          American heroes have been people with curious minds, strong purpose, courage, determination, stick-to-itiveness, and a proud fierce loyalty. Through every hardship, they have refused to give up. (Curtain opens to reveal Cub Scouts in appropriate costume with props to illustrate various heroes.

Cub Scout #1:         Miles Standish came with the pilgrims seeking religious freedom and learned to live with the Indians. After the first years harvest, they celebrated Thanksgiving.

Cub Scout #2:         During the revolutionary war the minutemen and other great heroes fought for independence and founded our nation. Men like Patrick Henry, “Give me liberty or give me death.”

Cub Scout #3:         There are many heroes during the era of explorers. People like Daniel Boone and Davy Crockett gave us many good examples of overcoming danger and other obstacles.

Cub Scout #4:         Some of today’s heroes might include the astronauts who continue to explore space and reach towards the unknown. Many of the books we read tell of possible adventures and the need to be prepared in all instances. People like Neil Armstrong fire up an imagination.

Cubmaster:          For you Cub Scouts the United States is still a land of expending opportunity. Tonight we have (number) of boys who have had the determination, stick-to-itiveness, and loyalty to follow the trail of the Wolf and Bear and complete the achievements for their badges and extra credit electives for arrow points. (Call boys and parents forward announcing each separately.  Award the badge to the parent to give to the boy and congratulate all. Lead Cheer Follow this procedure with all Cub Scouts.)

Asst CM:               Now we also have (number) Webelos Scouts with strong purpose and curious minds. Mr. Webelos Leader, will you please come forward and present the awards earned by the Webelos this past month. (Webelos leader comes forward and presents the awards with appropriate explanation.)

Cubmaster:          Offer final congratulations and does appropriate applause stunts. Applause stunts can be done for each individual boy as his award is presented and a final cheer for the entire group.

TALL TALES FOR SMALL MALES

Heart of America Council

Setting: A den meeting at Mrs. Smith’s home. All are seated.  Call boys for awards after each boy finishes his part and before Mrs. Smith talks.  Be sure to lead a cheer for each group.  This ceremony will work with rank awards or others, e.g Summertime Fun, Outdoor, Camp Awards.

Mrs. Smith: Today, Cub Scouts, we’re going to have ourselves some fun. This month’s theme is Adventures in Books, so answer roll call with a character from a book you have read. Johnny…

Johnny: My name is Johnny and long ago,
My great grandpa planted many a row.
And if hadn’t you’d surely cry,
Cause you wouldn’t have any apple pie.
He was Johnny Appleseed!
And with me I have a bag of special seeds
For the new Bobcats.

Mrs. Smith:      Very good, Johnny! Now, Meriweather and William…

Paul:      Just call us Lewis and Clark—those are our great-great uncles’ names;
Travelin' together they mapped our western territory;
And helped each other to learn to live in the frontier,
And learned about Indians from Sacjawea
They worked together just like you Tigers and your Adult Partners do
And listened to leaders as they explained what to do

Mrs. Smith:      Very good, Lewis and Clark! Now, Paul…

Paul:      Just call me Paul—that’s my uncle’s name;
A big blue ox was part of his fame;
When Babe got thirsty from the heat,
Uncle Paul dug the Great Lakes—wasn’t that neat?
He was Paul Bunyan, and he saw lots of great Wolves on his travels.

Mrs. Smith:      Oh, Paul—what a story! All right, David, it’s your turn…

David:   My name is Davy and back many a year
The forest bears would shake with fear
If by chance they saw a coonskin hat--
‘Cause that was my Uncle, Davy Crockett!
At times Uncle Davy gave gifts to the special Bears.

Mrs. Smith:      That’s pretty tall, David. Now, let’s hear from Casey…

Casey:   When I was little, and Christmas came,
My folks gave me a set of trains.
I guess folks thought I was kind of racy,
So now they call me “Little Casey.”
Webelos badges would ride on my train.

Mrs. Smith:      Well boys, I’d no idea that this den had such famous uncles and granddads. And, I’ve never heard such tall, tall tales from so many different small, small males!

Wizard of Oz Advancement Ceremony

Southern NJ Council

Equipment: Oil can, glass of water, and a heart cut from poster board.

Narrator: Over the years there have been a lot of stories about make believe people. One very popular story is the Wizard of Oz. Let’s picture ourselves in Munchkin Land where the house has just fallen. After a short time a Munchkin helps Dorothy by telling her to put on the ruby slippers that the Wicked Witch of the East was wearing because the shoes have a charm. The Munchkins got the trip started for Dorothy to get back to Kansas.

The Bobcat is the first rank in Cub Scouting and is what gets a boy started on the advancement trail. (Call Bobcat candidates and parents forward). Discuss the accomplishments and present the badge to the parents to present to the boy.   Lead cheer.

With the help of the Munchkins, Dorothy and her dog, Toto, started towards the Emerald City to see the Wizard of Oz.  The Munchkins helped Dorothy just as the leaders and boys in the pack help a new boy earn his Bobcat.

(Call the Tiger Cubs and their parents forward). Toto was with Dorothy everywhere, just as a Tiger Cub and his adult partner participate in Scouting together.  Tonigt we have the following awards for our Tiger Cubs … .  Present awards to Adult partners.  Lead cheer.

On the way she met the Scarecrow who wanted a brain so he can be like a man. She also met the Lion who wanted courage. Another person she met on the trail was the Tin Man who wanted a heart. When they met the Wizard of Oz, they all explained their needs.

(Call the Wolf Cub Scouts and their parents forward).
The Wolf Cub Scouts are like the Scarecrow. The Wizard told the Scarecrow that he is learning everyday and experience brings knowledge and the more experience the have, the more knowledge will be gained. As the Wolf Cub Scout works to complete the requirements in his book, he is gaining knowledge and the harder he works, the more knowledge he will gain. Congratulate the Scouts for their accomplishment. Present the badge to the parents to present to the boy.

(Call the Bear Cub Scouts and their parents forward)
The Tin Man is like the Bear Cub Scout. The Tin Man wanted a heart and told the Wizard that he will bear all the happiness if he gives him a heart. A big heart gives one happiness. It takes a big heart to complete the Bear requirements and in doing so, the happiness is spread to the parents because the parents have helped their Scout to receive this award. (Have the badge attached to a heart). Present award to parents to present to the Scout.

(Call the Webelos Scouts and their parents forward). The Webelos are like the Lion. They need confidence to complete the requirements in their book. They also have to show true courage because there are some difficult activities to complete. The Wizard told the lion that true courage is facing danger when you are afraid. (Pick up the glass of water). In this glass is the courage you need to complete  the requirements to earn the Arrow of Light. Drink the courage. Congratulate the Scout and give the award to the parents to present to the Scout.

(Call the Webelos Scouts who have completed the Arrow of Light forward with their parents). The trail that was taken in this tale was called the yellow brick road. The yellow brick road in Cub Scouting is the trail to the top, which is to earn the Arrow of Light. You have faithfully followed the trail to the top and you have earned the highest honor a Cub Scout can earn. Present award to the parents to present to the Scout.

If you do not have any Arrow of Light candidates, finish by saying:  The trail that was taken in this tale was called the yellow brick road. The yellow brick road in Cub Scouting is the trail to the top, which is the Arrow of Light. All of these Scouts have begun a journey down their own yellow brick road.

Daniel Boone Advancement

Southern NJ Council

Personnel: Cubmaster (CM) in uniform and Assistant Cubmaster (CA), dressed as Daniel Boone

Daniel:   Howdy, folks! My name is Daniel Boone. I understand this is a good place to get me a mess of bobcats!

CM:        You must be a stranger around here. This is a Cub Scout pack meeting, and the only bobcats around here are the Cub Scouts who have earned the Bobcat badge. Would the following Cub Scouts and their parents please come forward? (CM tells story of the Bobcat badge, presents badges, and pins to families, and they return to their seats)

Daniel:   Well, that was an interesting story about them Bobcats, what other animals are in this hear Pack??

CM:        We don't have any real animals.  For example, our Tigers cubs are the youngest members of the Pack.  Call Tigers and Adult Partners forward and present awards. Lead Cheer.

Daniel:   Well, didn't you talk about a pack of wolves in your pack?

CM:        Oh, Mr. Boone, I'm sorry. The wolves you heard about are our Cub Scouts who are climbing (or have climbed) the trail of Scouting to the next advancement rank - the Wolf Badge. (Call boys and parents forward.)  Present awards.  Lead Cheer.

Daniel:   Very impressive! But I also heard you had some mighty big bears in these parts. Don't see nary a one out there!

CM:        The bears in these parts are Cub Scouts who are a year older and wiser than our Wolves. They are learning to take care of knives and tools, all about how to tie knots, and even about you, Mr. Boone. (Call boys and parents forward) Present awards.  Lead cheer. Would you like to see our Webelos get their awards, Mr. Boone?

Daniel:   What in tarnation is a Webelos? I aint never heard of that critter!

Webelos:               We'll Be Loyal Scouts!

Daniel:   Now that, I understand. I'm a loyal "trail" scout myself.

CM:        Webelos Scouts have learned about our government, know the rules of outdoor fire safety, and have slept under the stars. (Present Webelos badges and activity pins)

Daniel:   Well now Cub Scouting sounds like a mighty fine way to raise a young'un. Wish we'd had Cub Scouts when I was a lad. So long, now!


 

Ideas for Ceremonies

Southern NJ Council

ü  Give each boy an apple with his award and tell them that Johnny Appleseed would be as proud of them as his parents and everyone in the pack are.

ü  To give recognition to leaders and parents, who have done something for the pack, give them a package of seeds (preferable apple) and tell them you appreciate the seeds they are planting for the future.

ü  Another recognition for adults, who have helped during the month, is to give them a package of lifesavers and tell them they are just like Molly Brown, unsinkable in helping our pack.

ü  Use a fake tree or small live one in a pot, put the boys awards in plastic apples and attach to the tree. The boys can "pick the apple" and get their awards.

The Pack’s Library
An Arrow of Light Ceremony

Scouter Jim, Great Salt Lake Council

 

Props:

Recipe box with 8 script cards

Webelos Book

Make 6 cardboard books, or blank covers for books -
Title the books "Arrow of Light Comes to Life,", "Adventures in Webelos,", "Arrow of Light Journal,", "An Arrow of Light Story,", "The Arrow of Light," and "Arrow of Light Future."  

4-6 items obtained about Cub Scout ahead of time to surprise him.  (Photos of him at events, patches he received, projects he made in camp or at den meetings, souvenirs from trips)

Ceremony:

This ceremony depends on the ability of the Cubmaster and Assistant Cubmaster or Webelos leader to ham it up and carry on the suggested conversations.  The recipe box becomes the pack’s library card catalog.

«  The Cubmaster and assistant Cubmaster have found the card catalog and eagerly discuss wanting to see what adventures are in the pack’s books.

«  They find the section labeled, “Arrow of Light.” They wonder out loud what books are in that section.

«  The first card leads them to the Webelos Handbook. The requirements to earn the Arrow of Light are reviewed.

«  The second card is a book titled “Arrow of Light Comes to Life.” This book brings to life the items collected from the Cub Scout receiving his Arrow of Light. Display and talk about the surprise items.

«  The third card is for the book “Adventures in Webelos” in which the den leader shares a service/ activity related to the Cub Scout.

«  The fourth card is for “Arrow of Light Journal” where the parents share something unique about their son. They could also have written a letter that is in the journal and can be read then given to their Cub Scout.

«  The fifth card is for “An Arrow of Light Story.” The Cub Scout then shares his favorite activity he did to earn the Arrow of Light.

«  The sixth card/book is “The Arrow of Light.” The Cubmaster displays the award. The Cub Scout then gives the pin to his mother, after which, the Father can present the award with either the Cub Scout or Boy Scout handshake.

«  The seventh card/book is for “Arrow of Light Future.” This book is the book that is created as each Cub Scout lives the Scout values and adheres to the meaning of the Arrow of Light. The meaning and principles are explained.

«  The eighth card is for the Cub Scout to quote the Scout Law or Promise and lead everyone in his favorite cheer.

 

Materials found in Baloo's Bugle may be used by Scouters for Scouting activities provided that Baloo's Bugle and the original contributors are cited as the source of the material.

Scouts Using the Internet Cartoon - Courtesy of Richard Diesslin - Click to See More Cartoons
© 1994-2014 - U.S. Scouting Service Project | Site Map | Disclaimer | Project Team | Web Stats | Contact Us | Privacy Policy
USSSP is Proud to be Hosted by Latisys.com and Lunarpages.com.

Materials found at U. S. Scouting Service Project, Inc. Websites may be reproduced and used locally by Scouting volunteers for training purposes consistent with the programs of the Boy Scouts of America (BSA) [Links to BSA Sites], the World Organization of the Scout Movement (WOSM) or other Scouting and Guiding Organizations. No material found here may be used or reproduced for electronic redistribution or for commercial or other non-Scouting purposes without the express permission of the U. S. Scouting Service Project, Inc. (USSSP) or other copyright holders. USSSP is not affiliated with BSA or WOSM and does not speak on behalf of BSA or WOSM. Opinions expressed on these web pages are those of the web authors. You can support this website with in two ways: Visit Our Trading Post at www.ScoutingBooks.com or make a donation by clicking the button below.
(U.S. Scouting Service Project Donation)


(Ruth Lyons Memorial Donations)