Baloo's Bugle

September 2007 Cub Scout Roundtable Issue

Volume 14, Issue 2
October 2007 Theme

Theme: Down on the Farm
Webelos: Citizen & Showman
Tiger Cub
Requirement 1

AUDIENCE PARTICIPATIONS

A Trip to the Farm

Baltimore Area Council

Divide the audience into seven groups. Assign each of the groups one of the words below. Read the story. When one of the designated words is read, the appropriate group makes the indicated response.  Practice as you make assignments.

Cubmaster -                      Do your best! (Cub Scout salute)

Den Leader -                                 Now, boys! (Shake finger)

Webelos Den Leader -                         We’ll be (Stomp feet)

Song Leader -                           Encore, encore (Clap hands)

Cow -                                               Moooo (Interlock fingers,
                  turn hands upside down with thumbs extended)

Pig -           Oink, oink, oink (Push up the end of your nose)

Sheep -                                                         Baaaaa (Wag tail)

Once upon a time a CUBMASTER, a DEN LEADER, a WEBELOS DEN LEADER, and a SONG LEADER were traveling across the countryside in an OLD CAR. As the night approached, they passed a farm. Grazing in the pasture were a COW, a PIG, and a SHEEP. Rain began to fall as darkness closed in around them. Suddenly the OLD CAR stopped dead. Unable to fix the OLD CAR, the CUBMASTER, the DEN LEADER, the WEBELOS DEN LEADER, and the SONG LEADER walked back to the farm where they had seen the COW, the PIG, and the SHEEP.

Greeted at the farmhouse door by the farmer, the CUBMASTER, the DEN LEADER, the WEBELOS DEN LEADER, and the SONG LEADER asked to spend the night. ‘Certainly,” said the farmer. “I myself have an OLD CAR and know how undependable they can be. But I only have room for three in my small house and one of you will have to sleep in the barn with my COW, my PIG, and my SHEEP.” “That’s okay,” said the CUBMASTER. “I will sleep in the barn.”

Ten minutes passed and there was a knock on the door of the farmhouse. When the farmer opened the door, there stood the CUBMASTER. “I’m sorry,” he said. “But the COW made so much noise I couldn’t sleep.” “I am used to COWS,” said the DEN LEADER. “I will sleep in the barn.”

Ten minutes passed and there was a knock on the door of the farmhouse. When the farmer opened the door, there stood the DEN LEADER. “I’m sorry,” said the DEN LEADER. “I am used to COWS, but the PIG made so much racket that I couldn’t sleep.” “Think nothing of it,” said the WEBELOS DEN LEADER. “I am used to COWS and PIGS. I will sleep in the barn.”

Another ten minutes passed and there was another knock on the farmhouse door. “I am used to COWS and PIGS,” the WEBELOS DEN LEADER said when the door opened. “But the SHEEP made so much noise that I couldn’t sleep. “ “Then I will sleep in the barn,” said the SONG LEADER. “But before I go to sleep, I will practice the songs for the next pack meeting.”

The farmer went to bed for the night. Immediately, there was yet another knock on the door. He got up and opened the door. There stood the COW, the PIG, and the SHEEP.

Jolly Green Giant & The Scarecrow

Heart of America Council

Divide the audience into four groups. Assign each of the groups one of the words below. Read the story. When one of the designated words is read, the appropriate group makes the indicated response.  Practice as you make assignments.

Jolly Green Giant -                     Ho-ho-ho

Little Green Sprout -                              Me

Scarecrow -                                    Booooo

Corn -                                    Pop, pop, pop

Come gather around me, all ye Cub Scouts.
As I tell you the story of the Little Green Sprout

The wise and friendly Scarecrow knows all, you see, About how the Jolly Green Giant and his small friend came to be.

It seems these two friends in a big field of Corn
One bright sunny day, most surely before you were born.

For the old Scarecrow some talk overheard,
And has come here now to pass along the word.

In the field of Corn stood Farmer Brown and his son,
Hoeing out all those weeds till the day was done,

How those two worked as they did toil and sweat
To make their new crop the finest one yet.

The poor Scarecrow felt so guilty that day,
For all he must do was scare birds away.

He heard people say, “Isn’t that Scarecrow grand.
He’s made this Corn field the best in the land.”

This made him sad and down deep in his heart,
Scarecrow knew that this job was just a small part.

As he stood there and watched, an idea came to his head,
The farmer and son were hoeing, the Scarecrow then said,

“I’ll call them Jolly Green Giant and Little Green Sprout.
‘Til soon the whole world will surely find out,

That the fields of Corn and other crops too
Are grown by people like these faithful two.”

So he told the Jolly Green Giant and Little Green Sprout
How he knew what they did and sang praises with no doubt.

So the story of the Jolly Green Giant &Little Green Sprout
Was spread to people near and far and all round about.

So, don’t think, my friend, it’s just a bunch of Corn
‘Cause that’s the truth of how those two were born.

Whenever you hear of that famed Jolly Green Giant
Now you’ve heard the secret from the old Scarecrow
Of how those green people help make things grow.

Remember that those folks you see hoeing away,
Are symbolized now by that green pair today.

Three cheers for Jolly Green Giant, Little Green Sprout,
Scarecrow, and that field of Corn where it all came about.

Planting A Garden

Heart of America Council

Divide the audience into four groups. Assign each of the groups one of the words below. Read the story. When one of the designated words is read, the appropriate group makes the indicated response.  Practice as you make assignments.

Gardener (thumbs pointed up)        With a green thumb

Cucumber                                                              Cool man

Onions (wipes tears from eyes)       Boo Hoo, Boo Hoo

Tomato                                                      Let me catch up!

One day our Gardener went out to plant his garden.  The Gardener chose to plant his plot with many vegetables including Cucumbers, Tomatoes, and Onions.  The Gardener took some seeds and planted first a row of Cucumbers, then a row of Onions, then a row of Tomatoes.

The Gardener then stood back to watch his garden grow.  Soon the Cucumbers, Onions, and Tomatoes had sprouted.  The Cucumbers fell in love with the Tomatoes but the Onions stood between them.  It looked as though this budding romance would never be, because the Cucumbers were in one row and the Tomatoes were in another and the Onions were coming up between the two.  The Cucumbers grew to be big and tall, and the Tomatoes grew to be plump and sweet, but the Onions still separated them.

Alas all is not lost, one day, later in the season, our Gardener went out to his garden and picked the Tomatoes, Cucumbers, and Onions, and the Gardener made a great salad.  In this salad he placed the Cucumbers, the Tomatoes, and the Onions.  The Cucumber was at last by his beloved Tomatoes, while the Onion had to stand aside.  That is, until the Gardener ate his salad.

 

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