Cub Scout Academics

Geography Belt Loop

Geography


The requirements listed below are taken from the
Cub Scout Academics and Sports Program Guide (34299B) 2006 Printing.

These requirements have been superseded by those in 34299 - 2009 Revision.
Click here to see the current requirements.


Webelos Scouts that earn the Geography Belt Loop while a Webelos Scout
also satisfy requirement 12 for the Traveler Activity Badge.

Requirements

Tiger Cubs, Cub Scouts, and Webelos Scouts may complete requirements in a family, den, pack, school, or community environment. Tiger Cubs must work with their parents or adult partners. Parents and partners do not earn loops or pins.

Belt Loop

Complete these three requirements:

  1. Draw a map of your neighborhood. Show natural and manmade features. Include a key or legend of map symbols.
  2. Learn about the physical geography of your community. Identify the major landforms within 100 miles. Discuss with an adult what you learned.
  3. Use a world globe or map to locate the continents, the oceans, the equator, and the northern and southern hemispheres. Learn how longitude and latitude lines are used to locate a site.

Academics Pin

Earn the Geography belt loop, and complete five of the following requirements:

  1. Make a three-dimensional model of an imaginary place. Include five different landforms, such as mountains, valleys, lakes, deltas, rivers, buttes, plateaus, basins, and plains.
  2. List 10 cities around the world. Calculate the time it is in each city when it is noon in your town.
  3. Find the company's location on the wrapper or label of 10 products used in your home, such as food, clothing, toys, and appliances. Use a world map or atlas to find each location.
  4. On a map, trace the routes of some famous explorers. Show the map to your den or family.
  5. On a United States or world map, mark where your family members and ancestors were born.
  6. Keep a map record of the travels of your favorite professional sports team for one month.
  7. Read a book (fiction or nonfiction) in which geography plays an important part.
  8. Take part in a geography bee or fair in your pack, school, or community.
  9. Choose a country in the world and make a travel poster for it.
  10. Play a geography-based board game or computer game. Tell an adult some facts you learned about a place that was part of the game.
  11. Draw or make a map of your state. Include rivers, mountain ranges, state parks, and cities. Include a key or legend of map symbols.

Page updated on: May 30, 2013



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