CLIMBING


These were the REQUIREMENTS before the REVISIONS
made when a new pamphlet was issued during 2006

To see the current requirements Click Here

REQUIREMENTS were previously REVISED as of January 1, 2000.

To see the changes which were made in 2000, Click here.

Click here for the previous requirements


  1. Show that you know first aid for injuries or illnesses that may occur during climbing activities, including hypothermia, blisters, sprains, snakebite, abrasions, fractures, and insect bites or stings.
  2. Identify the conditions that must exist before performing CPR on a person. Demonstrate proper technique in performing CPR using a training device approved by your counselor.
  3. Present yourself properly dressed for belaying, climbing, and rappelling (i.e., appropriate clothing, footwear, and a helmet; rapellers must wear gloves).
  4. Location. Do the following:
    1. Explain how the difficulty of climbs is classified, and apply classifications to the rock faces or walls where you will demonstrate your climbing skills.
    2. Explain the following: top-rope climbing, lead climbing, and bouldering.
    3. Evaluate the safety of a particular climbing area. Consider weather, visibility, the condition of the climbing surface, and any other environmental hazards.
    4. Determine how to summon aid to the climbing area in case of an emergency.
  5. Verbal signals. Explain the importance of using verbal signals during every climb and rappel, and while bouldering. With the help of the merit badge counselor or another Scout, demonstrate the verbal signals used by each of the following:
    1. Climbers
    2. Rappellers
    3. Belayers
    4. Boulderers and their spotters
  6. Rope. Do the following:
    1. Describe the kind of rope acceptable for use in climbing and rappelling.
    2. Show how to examine a rope for signs of wear or damage.
    3. Discuss ways to prevent a rope from being damaged.
    4. Explain when and how a rope should be retired.
    5. Properly coil a rope.
  7. Knots. Demonstrate the ability to tie each of the following knots. Give at least one example of how each knot is used in belaying, climbing, or rappelling.
    1. Figure eight on a bight
    2. Figure eight follow-through
    3. Water knot
    4. Double fisherman╣s knot (Grapevine knot)
  8. Harnesses. Correctly put on at least ONE of the following:
    1. Commercially made climbing harness
    2. Tied harness
  9. Belaying. Do the following:
    1. Explain the importance of belaying every climber and rappeller.
    2. Belay three different climbers ascending a rock face or climbing wall.
    3. Belay three different rappellers descending a rock face or climbing wall.
  10. Climbing. Do the following:
    1. Show the correct way to tie into a belay rope.
    2. Climb at least three different routes on a rock face or climbing wall, demonstrating good technique and using verbal signals with a belayer.
  11. Rappelling. Do the following:
    1. Using carabiners and a rappel device, secure your climbing harness or tied harness to a rappel rope.
    2. Tie into a belay rope set up to protect rappellers.
    3. Rappel down three different rock faces or three rappel routes on a climbing wall. Use verbal signals to communicate with a belayer, and demonstrate good rappelling technique.
  12. Demonstrate ways to store rope, hardware, and other gear used for climbing, rappelling, and belaying.

BSA Advancement ID#: 133
Pamphlet Revision Date: 1999
Requirements last updated in 2000

Worksheets for use in working on these requirements: By Craig Lincoln Word Format PDF Format

Page updated on: May 02, 2013



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