Boy Scout
Advancement
Requirements Changes

Effective January 1, 2009


When there is a conflict between two published lists of requirements, such as Boy Scout Requirements (BSA Publication No. 33216) and a Merit Badge Pamphlet, the requirements book should be considered to be the controlling document, until a newer edition of Boy Scout Requirements is issued.

BSA issued new editions of ALL of the merit badge pamphlets on August 1, 2008.  The primary change to most of the pamphlets was the introduction of color photographs and diagrams, and new covers. The actual text and requirements, in most cases did not change from the previous editions. In some cases, however, the new editions do contain new information, and new requirements. If the copyright date in the new pamphlet is not 2008 or later, the text in the pamphlet, including the requirements, did not change, only the cover and illustrations.  In addition, two of the old pamphlets, for the Architecture and Landscape Architecture Merit Badges were combined into a single pamphlet, although the Merit Badges remain separate and distinct from each other. Also, one Merit Badge, Auto Mechanics, was renamed to Automotive Maintenance, (and the emblem on the badge was changed). Although a new edition of the Lifesaving merit badge pamphlet was issued, the requirements did not change. However, the footnote relative to alternative requirements for the Second Class and First Class rank swimming requirements was deleted.

Most of the Merit Badges listed below had new merit badge pamphlets issued on August 1, 2008, and have totally new or modified requirements listed in the new pamphlets. Archery MB, Mile Swim, and the Den Chief Service Award have requirements changes that first appeared in the 2009 edition of Boy Scout Requirements.  In either case, the requirements below became official on January 1, 2009.

Those Scouts working on any badges using the old requirements and who started before the new books were issued may complete the badge using the old requirements. Those starting work on a badge after the new books were issued, could, until December 31, 2008, use either the old or new requirements, at their option. If they used the old requirements, they may still complete the badge using the old requirements, even after January 1, 2009.

Scouts starting work on any of these badges now, after January 1, 2009, should use the new requirements.


REVISED MERIT BADGE REQUIREMENTS

Archery
Architecture - (8/1/2008)
Auto Mechanics
Automotive Maintenance- (8/1/2008)
Cinematography- (8/1/2008)
Coin Collecting- (8/1/2008)
Collections- (8/1/2008)
Drafting- (8/1/2008)
Emergency Preparedness- (8/1/2008)
Engineering- (8/1/2008)
Farm Mechanics- (8/1/2008)
Indian Lore- (8/1/2008)
Insect Study- (8/1/2008)
Landscape Architecture- (8/1/2008)
Lifesaving- (8/1/2008)
Motorboating- (8/1/2008)
Nature (1/1/2009)
Painting- (8/1/2008)
Pottery- (8/1/2008)
Radio- (8/1/2008)
Swimming- (8/1/2008)

REVISED REQUIREMENTS FOR OTHER AWARDS

Den Chief Service Award
Mile Swim


In the revisions below, where the requirements weren't completely rewritten, the wording changes are shown as follows:
New text is in bold GREEN underlined Serif text like this sentence.
Deleted portions are struck through RED italic text like this sentence.


Archery Merit BadgeArchery

There were minor changes to requirements 1(a)3 and 5.  In Requirement 5, Option A, requirement (f)(1), choice c was eliminated and choices d-f renumbered as c-e.  In Option B, requirement (f)(1), choice d was eliminated and choices e-f renumbered as d-e. In Requirement 5, in both Options, the word OR between the choices in item (f) was removed. The revisions are as follows:

  1.  
    1.  
      1. The four range safety whistle commands used on a range and their related verbal commands.
  2. Option A
    1. Do ONE of the following:
      1. Using a recurve or longbow and arrows with a finger release, shoot a single round of ONE of the following BSA, NAA,or NFAA rounds:
        1. An NFAA field round of 14 targets and make a score of 60 points.
        2. A BSA Scout field round of 14 targets and make a score of 80 points.
        3. A FITA/NAA Olympic (outdoor) round and make a score of 80 points.
          d.A Junior indoor* round I and make a score of 180 points.
        4. e. A FITA/NAA indoor* round and make a score of 80 points.
        5. f. An NFAA indoor* round and make a score of 50 points.
        OR
      2. Shooting 30 arrows in five-arrow ends at an 80-centimeter (32-inch) five-color target at 10 yards and using the 10 scoring regions, make a score of 150.
        OR
      3. As a member of the NAA's Junior Olympic Development Program (JOAD), qualify as a Yeoman, Junior Bowman, and Bowman.
        OR
      4. As a member of the NFAA's Junior Division, earn a Cub or Youth 100-score Progression patch.
  3. Option B
    1. Do ONE of the following:
      1. Using a compound bow and arrows with a finger release, shoot a single round of ONE of the following BSA, NAA, or NFAA rounds:
        1. An NFAA field round of 14 targets and make a score of 70 points.
        2. A BSA Scout field round of 14 targets and make a score of 90 points.
        3. A Junior 900 round and make a score of 200 points.
        4. A FITA/NAA Olympic (outdoor) round and make a score of 90 points.
          e. A FITA/NAA indoor* round I and make a score of 90 points.
        5. f. An NFAA indoor* round and make a score of 60 points.
        OR
      2. Shooting 30 arrows in five-arrow ends at an 80-centimeter (32-inch) five-color target at 10 yards and using the 10 scoring regions, make a score of 170.
        OR
      3. As a member of the NAA's Junior Olympic Development Program (JOAD), qualify as a Yeoman, Junior Bowman, and Bowman.
        OR
      4. As a member of the NFAA's Junior Division, earn a Cub or Youth 100-score Progression patch

Architecture Merit BadgeArchitecture

The merit badge pamphlets for this merit badge and for Landscape Architecture were combined into a single pamphlet. There was a minor change to requirement 3, with the addition of a note. Requirement 3 now reads as follows:

  1. Arrange to visit a construction project with the project's architect. Ask to see the construction drawings so that you can compare how the project is drawn on paper to how it is actually built. Notice the different building materials. Find out how they are used, why they were selected, and what determines how they are being put together.
    Note: This requirement necessitates advance planning and permission from your parents, your counselor, and the manager of the construction site. While on site, you must closely follow the safety procedures of the construction site, including wearing a hard hat.

Automotive Maintenance Merit BadgeAuto Mechanics Automotive Maintenance

The badge was renamed, the emblem on the merit badge now consists of a spoked wheel with a fleur-de-lis in the middle (as shown above), and the requirements were substantially changed and rearranged  The requirements now read as follows:

  1. Discuss with your counselor the safety equipment, tools, and clothing used while checking or repairing a motor vehicle. Use this equipment, tools, and/or clothing (when needed or called for) in meeting the requirements for this merit badge.
  2. Explain how an internal combustion engine operates and the differences between gasoline and diesel engines.
    3. Demonstrate your knowledge of general maintenance.

    General Maintenance, Safety, and Registration
    Do the following:
    1. Review the maintenance chart in the owner's manual. Explain the requirements and time limits.
    2. a. Demonstrate how to check the fluid level of the following:
      1. Brake Fluid
      2. Engine Oil
      3. Coolant
      4. Power steering fluid
      5. Windshield washer fluid
      6. Transmission fluid (automatic and standard)
      7. Battery fluid (if possible) and condition of the battery terminals
      Check battery fluid, if possible, and the condition of battery terminals.
    3. Show the location of Locate the fuse boxes; determine and the size of fuses. Demonstrate , and demonstrate the proper replacement of burned-out fuses.
    4. d. Review the maintenance chart in the owner's manual. Explain the requirements and time limits.
      Demonstrate how to check the condition and tension of belts and hoses.
    5. Check the lighting in the vehicle, including instrument, warning, and exterior bulbs.
      1. Choose a car cleaner and wax product for the vehicle. Explain clear-coat paint and the precautions necessary for care. Clean and wax the vehicle, both inside and out.
      2. Use a vinyl and rubber protectant (on vinyl tops, rubber door seals, sidewalls, etc.) and explain the importance of this protectant.
    6. f. Demonstrate how to check the condition and tension of belts and hoses.
      Locate and check the air filter.
    7. g. Demonstrate the following:
      1. Check the lighting in the vehicle, including instrument, warning, and exterior bulbs.
      2. Check headlight alignment
      Explain the purpose, importance, and limitations of safety belts and passive restraints.
    8. h. Demonstrate how to check the vehicle exhaust system.
      Find out the requirements for the state inspection in your state, including how often a vehicle needs to be inspected.
    9. Explain the importance of registering a vehicle and find out the annual registration fee for renewing your family car's registration.
  3. Dashboard. Do the following:
    1. Explain the function of the fuel gauge, speedometer, tachometer, oil pressure, and engine temperature gauge. Point out each one on the instrument cluster.
    2. Explain the symbols that light up on the dashboard and the difference between the yellow and red symbols. Explain each of the indicators on the dashboard, using the owner's manual, if necessary.
  4. Demonstrate your knowledge of the following:
    Tires. Do the following:
    1. Explain the difference between tire manufacturer's and vehicle manufacturer's specifications and show where to find them.
      1. Explain the difference between tire and vehicle manufacturer's information specifications and demonstrate where to find these specifications.
      2. Demonstrate how to check pressure and properly inflate a tire.
      3. Using the manufacturer's jack supplied with the vehicle:
        • Demonstrate how to engage the jack correctly on the vehicle.
        • Demonstrate how to change a tire correctly .
    2. Demonstrate how to check pressure and properly inflate a tire. Check the spare tire and make sure it is ready for use.
      1. Explain the difference between bias-belted tires and radial-belted tires.
      2. Diagram and explain in writing how to rotate bias-belted and radial-belted tires.
      3. Using the manufacturer's guidelines, rotate the tires on the vehicle.
    3. Explain why wheel alignment is important to the life of a tire. Explain camber, caster, and toe-in adjustments on wheel alignment.
      1. Explain the camber, caster, and toe-in adjustments on wheel alignment.
      2. Explain why wheel alignment is important to the life of a tire.
    4. Explain the purpose of the lateral-wear bar indicator.
    5. Explain how to dispose of old tires properly in accordance with local laws and regulations.
  5. 5. Demonstrate your knowledge of engine lubrication. Engine. Do the following:
    1. Explain the purpose of motor oil. Explain how an internal combustion engine operates. Tell the differences between gasoline and diesel engines. Explain how a gasoline-electric hybrid vehicle is powered.
    2. Explain where to find the recommended type and amount of oil to be used in the vehicle engine. Explain the purpose of engine oil. Explain the API service code, the SAE number, and the viscosity rating.
    3. Explain the difference in viscosity (10W/30 versus SAE 30). Explain where to find the recommended oil type and the amount of oil to be used in the vehicle's engine.
    4. Perform an oil change and oil filter change on a vehicle.
    5. Explain how to dispose of the used oil and filter properly.
  6. Cooling system Do the following:
    1. Explain the need for coolant in the cooling system.
    2. Explain how to flush Flush and change the engine coolant in the vehicle according to the manufacturer's instructions., and how to properly dispose of the used coolant.
    3. Explain how to dispose of used coolant properly.
  7. Demonstrate your knowledge of a fuel system. Fuel system. Do the following:
    1. Explain how the air and fuel system systems work together and why it is necessary to have an air filter and fuel filter.
    2. Explain how a carburetor works and how a fuel injection system works and how an on-board computer works with the fuel injection system.
    3. Explain how an on-board computer works with the fuel injection system. Show where the computer is located.
    4. Explain why it is necessary to have an air filter and a fuel filter. Locate them and change them according to the manufacturer's recommendations.
    5. Explain what fuel additives are. for both the carburetor and the fuel injection systems.
  8. Demonstrate your knowledge of ignition Ignition and electrical systems. Do the following:
    1. Diagram and explain the parts of the electrical system.
    2. Explain the cylinder engine sequence.
    3. Explain the purpose of the spark plug gap and if practical, change the spark plug. (Use an engine with spark plugs that can be reached without tilting the engine.)
    4. Demonstrate how to connect jumper cables on your battery properly. Explain how to jump-start a vehicle. change the spark plugs in any internal combustion engine (lawn mower, dirt bike, motorcycle).
    5. Explain the difference between electronic and point ignition systems.
      Demonstrate how to safely connect jumper cables to your car battery.
  9. Demonstrate your knowledge of a drive train Drive Train. Do the following:
    1. Diagram the drive train and explain the different parts.
    2. Explain the difference between automatic and standard transmissions.
    3. Explain the types of automatic transmission fluid.
    4. Explain the types of lubricants used in a standard transmission and in the differential.
    5. Explain the difference between front-wheel, rear- wheel, and four-wheel drive.
    6. Explain the gear ratio of the differential.
  10. Demonstrate your knowledge of a brake system. Brake System. Do the following:
    1. Explain the brake system (including anti-lock systems) and how it operates.
    2. Explain the differences between disc and drum systems.
    3. Demonstrate checking conditions on a vehicle how to check the condition of a vehicle's brake system. After checking make recommendations for repairs (if necessary).
  11. Explain the purpose, importance, and limitations of passive restraints.
    Do two of the following:
    1. Determine the value of three different vehicles you are interested in purchasing. One must be new and one must be used; the third vehicle can be new or used. For each vehicle, find out the requirements and cost of automobile insurance to include basic liability and options for collision, comprehensive, towing, and rental car. Using the three vehicles you chose and with your merit badge counselor's assistance, complete the operation/maintenance chart provided in the merit badge pamphlet. Use this information to determine the operating cost per mile for each vehicle, and discuss what you learn with your counselor.
    2. Choose a car cleaner and wax product for a vehicle you want to clean. Explain clear-coat paint and the precautions necessary for care. Clean the vehicle, both inside and out, and wax the exterior. Use a vinyl and rubber protectant (on vinyl tops, rubber door seals, sidewalls, etc.) and explain the importance of the protectant.
    3. Locate the manufacturer's jack Use the jack to demonstrate how to engage the jack correctly on the vehicle, then change a tire correctly.
    4. Perform an oil filter and oil change on a vehicle. Explain how to properly dispose of the used oil and filter.
  12. Find out about three career opportunities in the automotive industry. Pick one and find out about the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Discuss this with your counselor, and explain why this profession might interest you.

Cinematography Merit BadgeCinematography

Requirement 1 was rewritten and became 1a, and a new 1b was added. Requirements 2a and 2d were rewritten, and a minor change was made to 2c. New text was added to the start of requirement 3a, and requirement 4 was replaced. The new requirements read as follows:

  1. Explain and demonstrate the proper elements of a good motion picture.
    1. Visual storytelling
    2. Rhythm
    3. The 180-degree axis rule
    4. Camera movement
    5. Framing and composition of camera shots
    6. Lens selection
    Do the following:
    1. Discuss and demonstrate the proper elements of a good motion picture. In your discussion, include visual storytelling, rhythm, the 180-degree axis rule, camera movement, framing and composition of camera shots, and lens selection.
    2. Discuss the Cinematographer's role in the moviemaking process.
  2. Do the following:
    1. Tell In a three- or four-paragraph treatment, tell the story you plan to film, making sure that the treatment conveys a visual picture. in a three- or four-paragraph treatment. How does it read on paper?
    2. Prepare a storyboard for your motion picture (This can be done with rough sketches and stick figures.)
    3. Demonstrate six of the following motion picture shooting techniques.
      1. Using a tripod
      2. Panning a camera
      3. Framing a shot
      4. Selecting an angle
      5. Selecting proper lighting
      6. Handheld shooting
    4. Do ONE of the following, using Using motion picture techniques,, plan ONE of the following programs. in planning a program for your troop or school. Start with a treatment, and complete the requirement by presenting the this program to the a pack or your troop, patrol, or class.
      1. Film or videotape a court of honor and show it to an audience.
      2. Create a minifeature short feature of your own design using the techniques you learn learned.
      3. Film or videotape Shoot a vignette that could be used to train a new Scout in a Scouting skill.
  3. Do ONE of the following:
    1. With your parent's permission and your counselor's approval, visit Visit a film set or a television production studio and watch how production work is done.
    2. Explain to your counselor the elements of the zoom lens and three important parts.
  4. Explain the following jobs related to film or video production: director, producer, cinematographer, key grip, gaffer, best boy, assistant camera operator.
    Find out about three career opportunities in cinematography. Pick one and find out about the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Discuss this with your counselor. Explain why this profession might interest you.

Coin Collecting Merit BadgeCoin Collecting

Requirement 3 was rewritten. Requirements 5, 6, 7, and 8 were renumbered as 8, 5, 6, and 7, with a minor change to requirement 7 (old no. 8), and the wording of requirements 9d, 10a, and 10b were changed. The revised requirements read as follows:

  1. Understand how coins are made, and where the active U.S. Mint facilities are located.
  2. Explain these collecting terms:
    1. Obverse
    2. Reverse
    3. Reeding
    4. Clad
    5. Type set
    6. Date set
  3. Explain the grading terms poor, good, very good, fine, very fine, extremely fine, and uncirculated Uncirculated, Extremely Fine, Very Fine, Fine, Very Good, Good, and Poor. Show five different grade examples of the same coin type. Explain the term “proof” and why it is not a grade. Tell what encapsulated coins are.
  4. Know three different ways to store a collection, and describe the benefits, drawbacks, and expense of each method. Pick one to use when completing requirements.
  5. Do the following:
    1. Identify the people depicted on the following denominations of current U.S. paper money: $1, $2, $5, $10, $20, $50, and $100.
    2. Explain “legal tender.”
    3. Describe the role the Federal Reserve System plays in the distribution of currency.
    6.
    Do the following:
    1. Demonstrate to your counselor that you know how to use two U.S. or world coin reference catalogs.
    2. Read a numismatic magazine or newspaper and tell your counselor about what you learned.
  6. 7. Describe the 1999-2008 50 State Quarters Program. Collect and show your counselor five different quarters you have acquired from circulation.
  7. 8. Collect from circulation a set of currently circulating U.S. coins. Include one coin of each denomination (cent, nickel, dime, quarter, half-dollar, Susan B. Anthony or Sacagawea dollar). For each coin, locate the mint marks, if any, and the designer’s initials, if any.
  8. Do the following:
    1. Identify the people depicted on the following denominations of current U.S. paper money: $1, $2, $5, $10, $20, $50, and $100.
    2. Explain “legal tender.”
    3. Describe the role the Federal Reserve System plays in the distribution of currency.
  9. Do ONE of the following:
    1. Collect and identify 50 foreign coins from at least 10 different countries.
    2. Collect and identify 20 bank notes from at least five different countries.
    3. Collect and identify 15 different tokens or medals.
    4. For each year since the year of your birth, collect Collect a date set of a single type of coin since the year of your birth.
  10. Do ONE of the following:
    1. Tour a U.S. Mint facility, the Bureau of Engraving and Printing facility, or a Federal Reserve bank, or a numismatic museum or exhibit, and describe what you learned to your counselor.
    2. With your parent’s permission, attend a coin show or coin club meeting, or view the Web site of the U.S. Mint or a coin dealer, and report what you learned.
    3. Give a talk about coin collecting to a group such as your troop, a Cub Scout pack, or your class at school.
    4. Do drawings of five Colonial-era U.S. coins.

Collections Merit BadgeCollections

Requirements 5d & 5e had minor changes, requirement 6 was rewritten and renumbered as 5f, requirements 7 and 9 were renumbered as 6 and 7, and requirement 8 was replaced with new requirement 9.  The changes now read as follows:

    1. Explain how your collection is graded for value, physical defects, size and age. Show the various grading classifications or ratings used in your collection.
    2. List the national, state, or local association for collectors in your field of interest. responsive to your collection.
    3. Show the location of and explain to your counselor the identification number (if applicable), series, brand name (if any),and any special identification marks.
  1. Show the location of and explain to your counselor the following:
    1. Identification number (if applicable)
    2. Series
    3. Brand name (if any)
    4. Any other special identification marks
    7.
    Discuss with your counselor the plans you have to continue with the collection in the future.
  2. 8. Discuss with your counselor the career opportunities that may be available involving your collection.
    9.
    Discuss with your counselor why and how collecting has changed and how this applies to your collection.
  3. Find out about career opportunities in collecting. Pick one and find out the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Discuss this with your counselor, and explain why this profession might interest you.

Drafting Merit BadgeDrafting

The requirements were substantially changed and rewritten.  The requirements now read as follows:

  1. Format four TWO sheets of drawing paper (or two sheets of paper if you are completing requirement 3) with proper borders and title blocks for your projects - one for your manual project (see requirement 2) and one for your lettering project (see requirement 5).
    1. Make a rough sketch of your project drawings to determine the correct size of paper to format.
    2. Using either single-stroke vertical or slant Gothic lettering, fill in all important information in the title block sections of the formatted paper.
    Complete requirement 2 or 3 for your drawing projects.
  2. Prepare two of the following pencil drawings for reproduction, using two of the formatted sheets of paper and being sure to fill in the title block information.
    Using the formatted sheet of paper you prepared for your manual project, produce a pencil drawing as it would be used for manufacturing. Fill in all title block information. The manual drawing may be any one of the following drawing types:
    1. Architectural: Make a rough sketch of a room. From it, maker a finished scale floor plan. Using conventional symbols, show all openings, equipment, lights, and safety devices. Use an architectural scale size. scale drawing of an architectural project. The architectural drawing may be a floor plan, electrical, plumbing, or mechanical service plan; elevation plan; or landscaping plan. Use an architect's scale and show dimensions to communicate the actual size if features. Include any important notes and considerations necessary for construction.
    2. Mechanical: Make a scale drawing of some piece of craft work mechanical device or interesting object. Use the orthographic projection technique to show at least three views. Use dimension lines to show the actual size. The mechanical drawing may be of the orthographic or isometric style. Use an engineer's scale and show dimensions to communicate the actual size of features. Include any important notes and considerations necessary for construction.
    3. Electrical: Draw a simple schematic of a radio or electronic circuit. Properly print a bill of materials including all of the major electronic parts of the radio or electrical components used in the circuit. Use standard drawing symbols for the electronic components.
  3. Using a CAD (computer-aided drafting) system, prepare and plot one of the drawings in requirements 2a, 2b, or 2c. Create the format (border and title block) on the computer before starting the drawing.
    Produce a computer-aided design (CAD) drawing as it would be used in manufacturing. Fill in all title block information. The CAD drawing may be any one of the following drawing types:
    1. Architectural: Make a scale drawing of an architectural project. The architectural drawing may be a floor plan, electrical, plumbing, or mechanical service plan; elevation plan; or landscaping plan. Use an architect's scale and show dimensions to communicate the actual size if features. Include any important notes and considerations necessary for construction.
    2. Mechanical: Make a scale drawing of some mechanical device or interesting object. The mechanical drawing may be of the orthographic or isometric style. Use an engineer's scale and show dimensions to communicate the actual size of features. Include any important notes and considerations necessary for construction.
    3. Electrical: Draw a simple schematic of a radio or electronic circuit. Properly print a bill of materials including all of the major electrical components used in the circuit. Use standard drawing symbols for the electronic components.
  4. Using a formatted sheet of paper, prepare an isometric drawing of something not drawn in requirement 2 or 3. On the drawing, list which instruments you used.
    Discuss with your counselor how fulfilling requirements 2 and 3 differed from each other. Tell about the benefits derived from using CAD for requirement 3. Include in your discussion the software you used as well as other software options that are available.
  5. Lettering: Using single-stroke vertical or slant slant or vertical Gothic lettering, describe in forty words or less why CAD is used in a particular industry (aerospace, electronics, architectural, or other). Use the 8+-by-11-inch formatted sheet. (without the aid of a template or lettering guide) write a brief explanation of what you consider to be the most important benefit in using CAD in a particular industry (aerospace, electronics, manufacturing, architectural, or other). Use the experience gained in fulfilling requirements 2, 3, and 4 to support your opinion. Use the formatted sheet of paper you prepared in requirement 1 for your lettering project.
  6. Describe the three most common methods of reproducing pencil drawings. Describe one method of reproducing a computer drawing. Make copies of one of your drawings using one of these methods.
    Do ONE of the following (a or b):
    1. Visit a facility or industry workplace where drafting is part of the business. Ask to see an example of the work that is done there, the different drafting facilities, and the tools used.
      1. Find out how much of the drafting done there is manual, and how much is done using CAD. If CAD is used, find out what software is used and how and why it was chosen.
      2. Ask about the drafting services provided. Ask who uses the designs produced and how those designs are used. Discuss how the professionals who perform drafting cooperate with other individuals in the drafting area and other areas of the business.
      3. Ask how important the role of drafting is to producing the end product or service that this business supplies. Find out how drafting contributes to the company's end product or service
    2. Using resources you find on your own such as at the library and on the Internet (with your parent's permission), learn more about the drafting trade and discuss the following with your counselor.
      1. The drafting tools used in the past - why and how they were used. Explain which tools are still used today and how their use has changed with the advent of new tools. Discuss which tools are being made obsolete by newer tools in the industry.
      2. Tell what media types were used in the past and how drawings were used, stored, and reproduced. Tell how the advent of CAD has changed the media used, and discuss how these changes affect the storage or reproduction of drawings.
      3. Discuss whether the types of media have changed such that there are new uses for the drawings, or other outputs, produced by designers. Briefly discuss how new media types are used in the industry today.
  7. Find out about three career opportunities in drafting. Pick one and find out about the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Discuss this with your counselor, and explain why this profession might interest you.

Emergency Preparedness Merit BadgeEmergency Preparedness

Changes were made to requirements 2a, 2b(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, & 12), 2c, 3a, 3b, 5, 6a, and 6c.  The changes are shown below:

  1. Do the following:
    1. Discuss with your counselor these three the aspects of emergency preparedness:
      1. Recognition of a potential emergency situation Prepare for emergency situations
      2. Prevention of an emergency situation Respond to emergency situations
      3. Reaction to an emergency situation Recover from emergency situations
      4. Mitigate and prevent emergency situations
      Include in your discussion the kinds of questions that are important to ask yourself as you consider each of these.
    2. Make a chart that demonstrates your understanding of each of the three aspects of emergency preparedness in requirement 2a (recognition, prevention, and reaction) (prepare, respond, recover, mitigate) with regard to 10 of the situations listed below. You must use situations 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 * below in boldface but you may choose any other five listed here for a total of 10 situations. Discuss this chart with your counselor.
      1. Home kitchen fire*
      2. Home basement/storage room/garage fire*
      3. Explosion in the home*
      4. Automobile accident*
      5. Food-borne disease (food poisoning)*
      6. Gas leak in a home or a building
    3. Meet with and teach your family how to recognize, prevent, and react to get or build a kit, make a plan, and be informed for the situations on the chart you created for requirement 2b. Complete a family plan. Then meet with your counselor and report on your family meeting, discussing discuss their responses, and share your family plan.
  2. Show how you could safely save a person from the following:
    1. Touching a live household electric wire.
    2. A room filled with carbon monoxide
  3. With another person, show a good way to move transport an injured person out of a remote and/or rugged area, conserving the energy of rescuers while ensuring the well-being and protection of the injured person.
  4. Do the following:
    1. Tell the things a group of Scouts should be prepared to do, the training needed training they need , and the safety precautions they should take for the following emergency services:
      1. Crowd and traffic control
      2. Messenger service and communication.
      3. Collection and distribution services.
      4. Group feeding, shelter, and sanitation.
    2. Find out who is your community's disaster/emergency response coordinator management director and learn what this person does to recognize, prevent and respond to prepare, respond to, recover from, and mitigate and prevent emergency situations in your community. Discuss this information with your counselor and apply what you discover to the chart you created for requirement 2b.

Engineering Merit BadgeEngineering

Requirement 7 was deleted and requirements 8 and 9 were renumbered as 7 and 8. New requirements 6c and 9 were added, and old requirements 6c - 6f were renumbered as 6d - 6g. Minor changes were made to requirements 1, 5a, 5b, 6d (old 6c), 7 (old 8). and 8 (old 9). Changes were made to requirements 2, 6a, and 6g (old 6f). The revisions to the requirements are shown below:

  1. Select some a manufactured item in your home (such as a toy or an appliance), and under adult supervision and with the approval of your counselor, investigate how and why it works as it does. Find out what sort of engineering activities were needed to create it. Discuss with your counselor what you learned and how you got the information.
  2. Select an engineering achievement that has had a major impact on society. Use the resources available to you to research it. Tell your counselor about the engineer(s) who made it Using resources such as the Internet (with your parent's permission), books, and magazines, find out about the engineers who made this engineering feat possible, the special obstacles they had to overcome, and how this achievement has influenced the world today. Tell your counselor what you learned.
  3. Do ONE of the following:
    1. Use the engineering-systems systems engineering approach to make step by step step-by-step plans for your next campout. List alternative ideas for such items as program schedule, campsites, transportation, and costs. Tell why you made the choices you did and what improvements were made.
    2. Make an original design for a piece of patrol equipment. Use the engineering-systems systems engineering approach to help you decide how it should work and look. Draw plans for it. Show the plans to your counselor, explain why you designed it the way you did, and explain how you would make it.
  4. Do TWO of the following:
    1. Transforming motion. Using common materials or a construction set, make a simple model that will demonstrate transforming motion. How does this make use of Explain how the model uses basic mechanical concepts like levers and inclined planes? to demonstrate motion. Describe an example where this mechanism is used in a real product.
    2. Understanding electronics. Using an electronic device such as a mobile telephone or portable digital media player, find out how sound travels from one location to another. Explain how the device was designed for ease of use, function, and durability.
    3. c. Using materials. Do experiments to show the differences in strength and heat conductivity in wood, plastic, and metal metal, and plastic. Discuss with your counselor what you have learned.
    4. d. Converting energy. Do an experiment to show how mechanical, heat, chemical, solar, and/or electrical energy may be converted from one or more types of energy to another. Explain your results. Describe to your counselor what energy is and how energy is converted and used in your surroundings.
    5. e. Moving people. Find out the different ways people in your community get to work. Make a study of traffic flow (number of vehicles and relative speed) in both heavy and light traffic periods. Discuss with your counselor what might be improved to make it easier for people in your community to get where they need to go.
    6. f. Science fair. Building an engineering project. Build an engineering project for a science or engineering fair or similar competition, and enter it. Enter a project in a science or engineering fair or similar competition. (This requirement may be met by participation on an engineering competition project team.) Discuss with your counselor what your project demonstrates and what kind , the kinds of questions visitors to the fair asked you about it. How , and how well were you able to answer their questions.
  5. Find out what high school courses you need to take to be admitted to an engineering college. Find out what other subjects would be helpful in preparing for an engineering career.
    8.
    Explain what it means for an engineer to be a registered Professional Engineer (P.E.). In what (PE). Name the types of engineering work for which registration is most important?
  6. 9. Study the Engineer's Code of Ethics. Explain how this it is like the Scout Oath and Scout Law.
  7. Find out about three career opportunities in engineering. Pick one and research the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Discuss this with your counselor, and explain why this profession might interest you.

Farm Mechanics Merit BadgeFarm Mechanics

Requirement 1 was replaced. Requirements 2, 5, and 6 were deleted.  Requirements 3, 4, 7, 8, and 9 were renumbered as 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6, with changes to some of the wording. A new requirement 7 was added. The revised requirements are shown below:

  1. List 10 common tools found in a well-equipped farm shop and explain how to safely use each one.
    Do the following:
    1. Discuss with your counselor the safety equipment, tools, and clothing used while checking or repairing farm equipment. Use this equipment, tools, and/or clothing (when needed or called for) in meeting the requirements for this merit badge.
    2. Draw a plan showing a well-equipped farm shop. Point out the shop's mandatory safety devices and features.
    3. Find all the universal warning and safety symbols on a piece of equipment and explain what they mean.
    4. Describe what a material safety data sheet (MSDS) is and tell why it is used. Obtain the MSDS for any engine coolant, oil, grease, fuel, hydraulic or transmission fluid, or other flammable or hazardous materials you use in meeting the requirements for this merit badge.
  2. Do the following:
    1. List ten safety devices in a well-equipped farm shop and explain the function of each.
    2. Demonstrate proper safety apparel and equipment to be worn and used when operating a grinder, wire-brush wheel, welder, or drill.
    3. Draw a plan showing a well-equipped farm shop. Point out mandatory safety devices and features in the shop.
    3. Explain how power is produced or transferred in a:
    1. Diesel engine
    2. Hydraulic system
    3. Transmission or any other power system.
  3. 4. Do TWO of the following:
    1. Replace the handle on any tool found on the farm.
    2. Build Organize a tool rack or a storage system with storage for nails, bolts, nuts, and washers.
    3. Properly grind Using a hand file, properly dress the mushroom head off of a chisel or punch.
    4. Correctly grind or file Using a hand file, properly dress a screwdriver tip.
    5. Do ONE of the following:
    1. Make the necessary adjustments to ready a piece of farm equipment or machinery for field operation.
    2. Choose a piece of farm machinery or equipment. Check all nuts, bolts, and screws. Tighten any that are loose. Replace those that are missing, worn, or damaged.
    3. Repair broken or worn farm machinery or equipment.
    6. Make a list of safety precautions for adjustments or repairs you make for requirement 5.
  4. 7. Do ONE of the following:
    1. On an engine-powered machine: Grease all fittings, change the oil and oil filter, clean the air cleaner filter, flush cooling system, clean the radiator fins, and replace the diesel fuel filters.
    2. With any farm machine, do a daily service check for field use. (Do things needed for best field performance.)
      For any engine-powered machine, create a preoperational checklist; include checking the engine coolant, engine oil, hydraulic and/or transmission fluid, and battery voltage (using a voltmeter). Using your checklist, conduct a preoperational check of that machinery or equipment.
    3. Prepare any farm machine for winter storage.
  5. 8. Visit an implement dealer. Interview the dealer, technician, or service manager for hints on good preventive maintenance. Ask why it is important, . What are the costs, and what ? What happens that causes wear or damage? Report what you learn discovered.
  6. 9. Explain each step in ONE of the following maintenance procedures:
    1. Tightening hydraulic fittings
    2. Servicing spark plugs Checking the air filter
      c. Lubricating a clutch-release bearing
    3. d. Cleaning a work piece with a wire-brush wheel.
  7. Find out about three career opportunities in farm mechanics. Pick one and find out about the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Discuss this with your counselor, and explain why this profession might interest you.

Indian Lore Merit BadgeIndian Lore

Minor editorial changes were made to requirements 2b, 2c, 2d, 3b, 3c, 4a, 4b, 4d, 4f, and 4h. More substantial changes were made to requirements 1, 2(introduction), 4e, and 4i.

Requirement 4e used to require "an Indian story of at least 300 words, or any number of shorter ones adding up to 300 words." We believe, but have not confirmed, that the change from 300 words to 25 words shown below was a typographical error in the pamphlet, but until we get confirmation from BSA, we've shown the wording in the pamphlet.

The revisions are shown below:

  1. Give the history of one American Indian tribe, group or nation that lives or has lived near you. Visit it, if possible. Tell about traditional dwellings, kind way of life, tribal government, religious beliefs, family and clan relationships, language, dress clothing styles, arts and crafts, food preparation, means of getting around, how they played games, if they were warlike or peaceful customs in warfare, where descendants members of the group now live, and how they live.
  2. Do TWO of the following. Use information about Focus on a specific group or tribe to complete the requirements.
    1. Make and decorate three items approved by your counselor used by the tribe, as approved by your counselor.
    2. Make an authentic model of a dwelling used by any an Indian tribe, group, or nation.
    3. Visit a museum to see Indian artifacts. Talk about Discuss them with your counselor. Identify at least 10 artifacts by tribe or nation, their shape, size, and use.
    1. Learn and show how a tribe traditionally cooked or prepared food. Make three food items.
    2. Give a demonstration showing how a specific Indian group traditionally hunted, fished, or trapped.
    1. Write or briefly describe how life would have been different for the European settlers if there had been no Indians native Americans to meet them when they came to this continent.
    2. Sing two songs in an Indian language. Explain their meaning meanings.
    3. Show 25 signs in Indian sign language. Include those that will help you ask for water, for food, and where the path or road leads.
    4. Learn in English (or the language you commonly speak at home or in the troop) an Indian story of at least 300 25 words, or any number of shorter ones adding up to 300 words. Tell the story or stories at a Scout meeting or campfire.
    5. Write or tell about eight things adopted by others from the Indian American Indians.
    6. Name five well-known American Indian leaders, either from the past or people who are alive of today. Give their tribes or nations. Describe what they did or do now that makes them notable.
    7. Learn about the Iroquois Confederacy, including how and why it was formed. Tell about its governing system, and its importance to the framers of our Constitution. Describe some of the similarities and differences between the governments of the United States and of the Six Nations (the Haudenosaunee or Iroquois Confederacy).

Insect Study Merit BadgeInsect Study

Old requirements 3, 5, and 10 were replaced with new requirements 4 and 5. Old requirements 4, 8, 9, and 11 were renumbered as 3, 9, 8, and 10. New requirement 11 was added, and text was added to the footnote, which now is referenced by requirement 7. The requirements now read as follows:

  1. Tell how insects are different from all other animals. Show how insects are different from centipedes and spiders.
  2. Point out and name the main parts of an insect.
  3. Collect and mount 50 different species.* Include six orders and 18 families of insects. Label each with common and scientific names, where possible.
    4. Describe the characteristics that distinguish the principal families and orders of insects.
  4. Do the following:
    1. Observe 20 different live species of insects in their habitat. In your observations, include at least four orders of insects.
    2. Make a scrapbook of the 20 insects you observe in 4a. Include photographs, sketches, illustrations, and articles. Label each insect with its common and scientific names, where possible. Share your scrapbook with your merit badge counselor.
    5. Show your collection.
  5. Do the following:
    1. From your scrapbook collection, identify three species of insects helpful to humans and five species of insects harmful to humans.
    2. Describe some general methods of insect control.
  6. Compare the life histories of a butterfly and a grasshopper. Tell how they are different.
  7. Raise an insect through the complete metamorphosis from its larval stage to its adult stage (e.g. raise a butterfly or moth from a caterpillar.*
  8. Tell the things that make social insects different from solitary insects.
    Observe an ant colony or a beehive. Tell that you saw.
  9. Observe an ant colony or a beehive. Tell that you saw.
    Tell the things that make social insects different from solitary insects.
  10. From your collection, identify:
    1. Four species of insects helpful to humans.
    2. Six species of insects harmful to humans.
      Describe some general methods of insect control.
    11.
    Tell how insects fit in the food chains of other insects, fish, birds, and mammals.
  11. Find out about three career opportunities in insect study. Pick one and find out about the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Discuss this with your counselor, and explain why this profession might interest you.

*Some insects are endangered species and are protected by federal or state law. Every species is found only in its own special type of habitat. Be sure to check natural resources authorities in advance to be sure that you will not be collecting any species that is known to be protected or endangered, or in any habitat where collecting is prohibited. In most cases, all specimens should be returned at the location of capture after the requirement is met. Check with your merit badge counselor for those instances where the return of these specimens would not be appropriate.


Landscape Architecture Merit BadgeLandscape Architecture

The merit badge pamphlets for this merit badge and for Architecture were combined into a single pamphlet. However, there were NO changes to the requirements for this badge.


Lifesaving Merit BadgeLifesaving

The merit badge pamphlet for this merit badge was revised.
There were NO changes to the requirements for this badge. However, the footnote shown below, relative to alternative requirements for the Second Class and First Class rank swimming requirements was deleted.

Note: Alternative requirements for the Second Class and First Class rank swimming requirements are available for Scouts with physical or mental disabilities if they meet the criteria listed on page 13 of the Boy Scout Requirements book, No. 33215.


Motorboating Merit BadgeMotorboating

Requirements 1 and 2 were combined and rewritten. Requirement 3 was replaced with requirement 2a, and requirements 2b and 3 were added. Requirements 4, 4b, 4c, 4d, and 4g were revised. Requirements 5, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 5e, and 5f were revised, and 5g was added. Requirements 6, 6a, and 6b were replaced and 6c was removed. The revised requirements are shown below.

  1. Show that you know first aid for injuries or illnesses that could occur while motorboating, including hypothermia, heatstroke, heat exhaustion, dehydration, sunburn, insect stings, tick bites, blisters, and hyperventilation.
    Do the following:
    1. Explain first aid for injuries that could occur while motorboating, including hypothermia, heat reactions, dehydration, motion sickness, insect stings, tick bites, and blisters.
    2. Identify the conditions that must exist before performing CPR on a person, and explain how such conditions are recognized. Demonstrate proper technique for performing CPR using a training device approved by your counselor.
  2. Do the following:
    1. Identify the conditions that must exist before performing CPR on a person. Explain how such conditions are recognized.
      Before doing requirements 3 through 6, successfully complete the BSA swimmer test.
    2. Demonstrate proper technique for performing CPR using a training device approved by your counselor.
      Name the different types of personal floatation devices (PFDs), and explain when each type should be use. Show how to choose and properly fit a PFD.
  3. Before doing the following requirements, successfully complete the BSA swimmer test. Jump feet first into water over your head in depth, swim 75 yards or 75 meters in a strong manner using one or more of the following strokes: sidestroke, breaststroke, trudgen, or crawl; then swim 25 yards or 25 meters using an easy, resting backstroke. The 100 yards or 100 meters must be swum continuously and include at least one sharp turn. After completing the swim, rest by floating as motionless as possible.
    Do the following:
    1. Explain inboard, outboard, and inboard/outboard motors and the uses and advantages of each. |discuss the special features of a bass boat and a ski boat.
    2. Explain the safety procedures and precautions involving handling fuel and engine servicing, and equipment storage and placement.
    3. Explain how to winterize a boat motor and tell why this procedure is necessary.
    4. Explain the safety procedures and precautions involving swimmers and skiers in the water, passenger positions under way, and boat wakes.
  4. Show you know safety laws for motorboating by doing the following:
    1. Explain the rules or laws affecting pleasure that apply to recreational boating in your area or state.
    2. Discuss with your counselor how the hazards of weather and heavy water conditions can affect both safety and performance in motorboating.
    3. Promise that you will live up to the Scout Boating code follow BSA Safety Afloat guidelines. Explain the meaning of each point.
    4. Explain the requirement on federal and state rules for a ventilation rules system, and state why this is needed. tell why these rules are required.
  5. Show you know how to run a motorboat Demonstrate proper boat-handling procedures and skills by doing the following the right way:
    1. Get in a boat. Board and assist others in boarding
    2. Fuel and check motor before starting the boat and complete a safety check.
    3. Start motor and get Get under way from a dock dockside or from a beach launch .
    4. Run a straight course for a quarter mile. Make right-angle turns to left or right. Make a U-turn at least a mile, showing procedures for overtaking and passing slower craft, yielding right-of-way, passing oncoming traffic, making turns, reversing direction, and using navigation aids.
    5. Stop an secure the boat in position on the open water using anchors; get . Drop anchor. Raise it. Get under way.
    6. Come alongside a dock. Tie up or beach.
      Land or dock; get out and assist others.
    7. Moor the boat and secure all gear.
  6. Show how to:
    Point out and explain the mechanical and safety features of a boat trailer.
    1. Tie up or take boat from water.
      Launch a boat from a trailer.
    2. Store gear.
      Remove a boat from the water using a trailer.
    3. Prepare motor for the winter.

Nature Merit BadgeNature

A minor change was made to requirements 4(c)(1), without notice. The change is shown below:

  1.  
    1.  
      1. Show that you can recognize the poisonous venomous snakes in your area.

Painting Merit BadgePainting

Minor changes were made to requirements 2b, 3, and 4, and requirement 8 was rewritten.  The changes were as shown below:

    1. Explain the differences between oil-based paints, Acrylic-based paints, and water-based paints.
  1. Prepare and paint two different surfaces using patching material, caulking, and the proper primers and topcoats. Suggested projects include an interior or exterior wall, a door, a piece of furniture, a concrete wall or floor , a porch rail, or a fence. Your counselor must preapprove the projects.
  2. Prepare and paint an item using harmonizing colors that you have created by tinting white base paint. (Use the color wheel in the center of this book.) selected using the color wheel in the Painting merit badge pamphlet.
  3. Discuss with your counselor the various career opportunities associated with the painting trade.
    Find out about career opportunities in the paint industry. Discuss the training and experience required, and explain why this profession might interest you.

Pottery Merit BadgePottery

Requirement 2 was renumbered as 2a and requirement 6 was renumbered as 2b. Minor editorial changes were made to requirements 3 & 4.   Requirement 8 was renumbered as 6, and requirement 7 as 7a. New options for requirement 7 were added as 7b and 7c.  A new requirement 8 was added. The changes were as shown below:

  1. Explain the properties and ingredients of a good clay body for the following:
    Do the following:
    1. Making sculpture
      Explain the properties and ingredients of a good clay body for the following:
      1. Making sculpture
      2. Throwing on the wheel
    2. Throwing on the wheel
      Tell how three different kinds of potter's wheels work.
  2. Make two drawings of pottery forms, each on an 8 1/2 by 11 inch sheet of paper. One must be a historical pottery type style. The other must be of your own design.
  3. Explain how radio waves carry information. Include in your explanation: transceiver, transmitter, receiver, amplifier, and antenna.
  4. Tell how three different kinds of potter’s wheels work.
    Explain the scope of the ceramic industry in the United States. Tell some things made other than craft pottery.
  5. Visit the kiln yard at a local college or other crafts school. Learn how the different kinds of kilns work, including the low-fire electric, high-fire gas or propane, wood or salt/soda, and raku.
    With your parent's permission and your counselor's approval, do ONE of the following:
    1. Visit the kiln yard at a local college or other craft school. Learn how the different kinds of kilns work, including low-fire electric, gas or propane high-fire, wood or salt/soda, and raku.
    2. Visit a museum, art exhibit, art gallery, artists' co-op, or artist's studio that features pottery. After your visit, share with your counselor what you have learned.
    3. Using resources from the library, magazines, the Internet (with your parent's permission), and other outlets, learn about the historical and cultural importance of pottery. Share what you discover with your counselor.
  6. Explain the scope of the ceramic industry in the United States. Tell some things made other than craft pottery.
    Find out about career opportunities in pottery. Pick one and find out about the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Discuss this with your counselor, and explain why this profession might interest you.

Radio Merit BadgeRadio

Requirements 1 was substantially rewritten. Requirements 2 and 3d were revised and renumbered as requirements 2a and 2b. Requirements 3b and 3c were revised. Requirement 6 was renumbered as 5 and requirement 5 was revised and renumbered as 6. Requirement 8 was revised and renumbered as 7. A new requirement 8 was added. Requirement 7 was revised and renumbered as 9. The revised requirements are shown below:

  1. Explain what radio is. Include in your explanation: the differences between broadcast radio and hobby radio, and the differences between broadcasting and two-way communicating. Also discuss broadcast radio and amateur radio call signs and using phonetics. Then discuss the following:
    1. The differences between broadcast radio and hobby radio.
    2. The differences between broadcasting and two-way communications.
    3. Radio call signs and how they are used in broadcast radio and amateur radio
    4. The phonetic alphabet and how it is used to communicate clearly.
  2. Do the following:
    Sketch a diagram showing how radio waves travel locally and around the world. How do the broadcast radio stations, WWV and WWVH, help determine what you will hear when you listen to a radio?
    1. Sketch a diagram showing how radio waves travel locally and around the world. Explain how the broadcast radio stations, WWV and WWVH can be used to help determine what you will hear when you listen to a shortwave radio?
    2. Explain the difference between a DX and a local station. Discuss what the Federal Communication Commission (FCC) does and how it is different from the International Telecommunication Union.
  3. Do the following:
    1. Draw a chart of the electromagnetic spectrum covering 100 kilohertz (kHz) to 1000 megahertz (MHz).
    2. Label the LF, MF, HF, VHF, UHF, and microwave portions of the spectrum on your diagram.
    3. Locate on your chart at least eight radio services such as AM and FM commercial broadcast, citizens band (CB), television, amateur radio (at least four ham amateur radio bands), and public service (police and fire).
    4. Discuss why some radio stations are called DX and others are called local. Explain who the FCC and ITU are.
  4. Explain how radio waves carry information. Include in your explanation: transceiver, transmitter, amplifier, and antenna.
  5. Learn the safety precautions for working with radio gear, particularly DC and RF grounding
    Do the following:
    1. Explain the differences between a block diagram and a schematic diagram.
    2. Draw a block diagram for a radio station that includes a transceiver, amplifier, microphone, antenna, and feed line.
    3. Explain the differences between an open circuit a closed circuit, and a short circuit.
    4. Draw eight schematic symbols. Explain what three of the represented parts do. Find three electrical components to match to three of these symbols.
  6. Explain the safety precautions for working with radio gear, including the concept of grounding for direct current circuits, power outlets, and antenna systems.
    Do the following:
    1. Explain the differences between a block diagram and a schematic diagram.
    2. Draw a block diagram that includes a transceiver, amplifier, microphone, antenna, and feedline.
    3. Explain the differences between an open circuit, a closed circuit, and a short circuit.
    4. Draw eight schematic symbols. Explain what three of the represented parts do. Find three electrical components to match to three of these symbols.
  7. Visit a radio installation (an amateur radio station, broadcast station, or public communications center, for example) approved in advance by your counselor. Discuss what types of equipment you saw in use, how it was used, what types of licenses are required to operate and maintain the equipment, and the purpose of the station.
  8. Find out about three career opportunities in radio. Pick one and find out the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Discuss this with your counselor, and explain why this profession might interest you.
  9. 7. Do ONE of the following: (a, OR b, or OR c )
    1. Amateur radio AMATEUR RADIO
      1. Tell why the FCC has an amateur radio service. Describe some of the activities that amateur radio operators can do on the air, once they have earned an amateur radio license.
      2. Using proper call signs, Q signals, and abbreviations, carry Carry on a 10 minute real or simulated radio contact using voice, or Morse Code, or digital mode ; use proper call signs, Q signals, and abbreviations. (Licensed ham amateur radio operators may substitute five QSL cards as evidence of contacts with amateur radio operators from at least three different call districts.) Properly log the real or simulated ham radio contact and record the signal report.
      3. Explain at least five Q signals or amateur radio terms you hear while listening.
      4. Explain some of the differences between the Technician, General, and Extra Class license requirements and privileges. Explain who gives administers amateur radio exams.
      5. Explain how you would make an emergency call on voice or Morse code. Tell why the FCC has an amateur radio service.
      6. Explain the differences between handheld transceivers versus and home "base" stations transceivers. Explain about the uses of mobile amateur radios radio transceivers and amateur radio repeaters.
    2. Broadcast radio BROADCAST RADIO
      1. Prepare a program schedule for radio station "KBSA" of exactly one-half hour, including music, news, commercials, and proper station identification. Record your program on audio tape audiotape or in a digital audio format using proper techniques.
      2. Listen to and properly log 15 broadcast stations; determine for five of these their transmitting power and general areas served. Determine the program format and target audience for five of these stations.
      3. Explain at least eight terms used in commercial broadcasting, such as segue, cut, and fade, continuity, remote, Emergency Alert System, network, cue, dead air, PSA, and playlist..
      4. Discuss the educational and licensing requirements and career opportunities in broadcast radio.
    3. Short-wave listening SHORTWAVE LISTENING
      1. Listen across several shortwave bands for two 4-hour four one-hour periods, one in the early morning and the other in the early evening - at least one period during daylight hours and at least one period at night. Log the stations properly and locate them geographically on a globe.
      2. For several major foreign stations (BBC in Great Britain or HCJB in Ecuador, for example), list several frequency bands used by each.
      3. Compare your morning and evening daytime and nighttime logs , noting ; note the frequencies on which your major foreign selected stations were loudest during each session. Explain the differences in the signal strength from one period to the next.
      4. Discuss the purpose of and careers in short-wave communications.
    8. Visit a radio installation approved in advance by your counselor (ham radio station, broadcast station, or public service communications center, for example). Discuss what types of equipment you saw in use, how it was used, what types of license are required to operate and maintain the equipment, and the purpose of the station.

Swimming Merit BadgeSwimming

Minor changes were made to requirements 1, 3, 4, 8a3, 9, and 10d.  The changes were as shown below:.

  1. Show that you know first aid for injuries or illnesses Discuss the prevention and treatment for health concerns that could occur while swimming, including hypothermia, dehydration, heat reactions, sunburn, heat exhaustion, heatstroke, muscle cramps, hyperventilation, spinal injury, stings and bites, and cuts and scrapes , spinal injuries, and hyperventilation.
  2. Before doing the following requirements, successfully complete Second Class rank requirements 7a through 7c 7a-7c and First Class rank requirements 9a through 9c 9a-9c
  3. Demonstrate survival skills by leaping jumping feetfirst into deep water wearing clothes (shoes, socks, swim trunks, long pants, belt, and long-sleeved shirt). Remove shoes and socks, remove and inflate the shirt, and show that you can float using the shirt for support. Remove and inflate the pants for support. Swim 50 feet using the inflated pants for support, then show how to reinflate the pants while using them for support still afloat.
      1. Describe the sport of scuba diving or snorkeling, and demonstrate your knowledge of BSA policies and procedures relating to this that sport.
  4. Following the guidelines set in the BSA Safe Swim Defense, in In water at least 8 7 feet deep, show a standing headfirst dive (kneeling start, bent-knee start, or standing dive) from a dock or pool deck. Show a long shallow dive, also from the dock or pool deck. If a low board (not to exceed 40 inches above water at least 9 feet deep) is available, show a plain front dive.
  5.  
    1. Discuss with your counselor the incentives and obstacles for adherence to staying with the fitness program you created in requirement 10c. Explain the unique benefits that could be gained from this program, and discuss how personal health awareness and self discipline would relate to your own willingness and ability to pursue such a program.

Den Chief Service Award CordsDen Chief Service Award

Requirement 10 was deleted, and old requirements 11 & 12 renumbered as 10 and 11.  Requirements 11c and 11h (old 12c and 12h) had minor revisions.  The changes were as shown below:

  1. Know the importance of the monthly theme.
    11. Meet as needed with the adult members of the den, pack or troop , team, or crew.
  2. 12. Complete FOUR of these projects:
    1. Advance one Boy Scout rank.
    2. Recommend to your Scoutmaster, Varsity Scout Coach, or Venturing Adviser another Boy Scout ,Varsity Scout, or Venturer to be a den chief.

MileSwim.jpg (8837 bytes)Mile Swim

Requirement 4 was revised.  The change is shown below:

  1. Swim 1 mile (1,600 meters) over an approved, a measured course that has been approved by the trained instructor who will supervise the swim.

 



This analysis was prepared as a service to Scouts and Scouters nationwide
Paul S. Wolf
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US Scouting Service Project, Inc.

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