US Scouting Service Project, Inc.

Boy Scout
Advancement
Requirements Changes

Effective January 1, 2016
with updates through September 26, 2016


The Guide to Advancement - 2015 and 2016 Boy Scout Requirements are the official Boy Scouts of America sources on Boy Scout advancement procedures.

When there is a conflict between two published lists of requirements, such as Boy Scout Requirements (BSA Publication No. 33216) and a Merit Badge pamphlet or the Boy Scout Handbook, the requirements book should normally be considered to be the controlling document, until a newer edition of Boy Scout Requirements is issued. However, the following excerpt from the Guide to Advancement, 2015 explains what to do when merit badge requirements change:

7.0.4.3 What to Do When Requirements Change

The current annual edition of Boy Scout Requirements lists the official merit badge requirements. Once new or revised merit badge requirements appear in this publication, which is released each January, any Scout just beginning work on a merit badge must use the requirements as stated there.

If changes to merit badge requirements are introduced in a revised merit badge pamphlet after the January release of the Boy Scout Requirements book, then the Scout has until the following January 1 to decide what to do. He may continue—or begin work—using the old merit badge requirements and the old pamphlet; or he may switch to—or begin work—using the new requirements and the new pamphlet. Unless it is otherwise stated in the merit badge pamphlet, Boy Scout Requirements, or official communications from the National Council, if a Scout chooses to use the old merit badge requirements and pamphlet, he may continue using them until he has completed the badge.

There is no time limit between starting and completing a badge, although a counselor may determine so much time has passed since any effort took place that the new requirements must be used.

During 2015, after multi-year period of review, BSA proposed changes, to the requirements for the Scout badge, which has now been officially designated a "rank", as well as to the requirements for all of the ranks from Tenderfoot to Eagle, and for Eagle Palms. These changes, in draft form, were announced during 2015 and changes to some of the draft requirements were made at various times during the year. A new edition of the Boy Scout Handbook was issued in January, 2016 and a new edition of Boy Scout Requirements in February, 2016, containing the final, approved, requirements. BSA published an excerpt from the Handbook, containing the revised ranks advancement requirements in late December, 2015. That excerpt is available for download as a PDF, in two forms, 8.5"x11" pages, and 5.5"x8.5" booklet size (designed for printing two up, front and back, on standard 8.5"x11" paper) which can be inserted into Scouts' existing Handbooks.

Those documents can be downloaded from the BSA web site at these URLs:

2016 Boy Scout Rank Requirements
2016 Boy Scout Rank Requirements - Printable Insert

In addition to the changes to the Boy Scout Rank requirements, the new edition of Boy Scout Requirements includes changes to the requirements for 18 merit badges, four with substantial changes, and 14 with minor changes or corrections.

Note that although the Signs, Signals, and Codes merit badge and the Animation merit badge could not be earned by Scouts until they were officially introduced in February, 2015, (Signs, Signals, and Codes) and May, 2015 (Animation) the requirements for those two merit badges were included in the 2015 edition of Boy Scout Requirements, and were included in our 2015 list of advancement changes once they were officially introduced. Consequently, we have not included the requirements for those badges in this document, but we have provided links to the requirements elsewhere on our web site.

Finally, the "Merit Badge Library" listing on the inside back cover, lists all merit badge pamphlets with their most recent (or planned) publication dates. Click here for our list of all of the merit badge pamphlets, which identifies the most recent edition of each, whether the old pamphlet can still be used, and when the requirements were last revised. Our list also identifies which merit badge pamphlets are available as Kindle books, through Amazon.com, and/or as Digital Interactive merit badge pamphlets through Scoutstuff.org.

Although BSA has previously announced plans to release a few more new merit badges in the coming years, including Exploring, Multi-Media, Computer Aided Design, and Advanced Computing, no current schedule has been announced for when those badges may be available, although the listing of merit badge pamphlets does indicate the Exploration pamphlet will have a revision date of 2016.

Scouts that, before January 1, 2015, had started work on the Computers merit badge, which is now obsolete (and which has been replaced by the Digital Technology merit badge), may CONTINUE working on that badge using the requirements that were in effect at when they started work. However, because the badge has been discontinued, Scouts may no longer START work on the Computers badge. Furthermore, while a Scout that completes the badge may receive advancement credit for earning it, since the badge has been dropped, it may be difficult or impossible to obtain an actual Computers merit badge for the Scout's uniform or merit badge sash, since BSA is no longer producing them, and has removed them from sale at Scout Shops.


RANK CHANGES

Scout
Tenderfoot
Second Class
First Class
Star
Life
Eagle
Eagle Palms

NEW Merit Badges which were issued during 2015

Signs, Signals, and Codes - Released on February 26, 2015
Animation - - Released on May 18, 2015

New Merit Badge tentatively scheduled to be issued in 2016

The "Merit Badge Library" includes an entry for an
Exploration merit badge pamphlet with a 2016 revision date,
so it appears that the badge will be made available at some point later in 2016 or early in 2017.

REVISED Merit Badges

These merit badges had major changes:

Cooking
Lifesaving
Photography
Snow Sports

These merit badges had minor changes:

American Business
American Labor
Archery
Camping
Chemistry
Citizenship in the Community
Citizenship in the World

Emergency Preparedness
Environmental Science
First Aid
Mining in Society
Personal Management
Railroading
Skating

This merit badge had changes in 2016,
but which were published AFTER the 2016 Boy Scout Requirements booklet was issued:

Dog Care
Forestry
Hiking
Traffic Safety


Changes to Rank Requirements

Due to the extensive nature of the changes to all of the rank requirements, this document does not identify the specific changes, but only shows the requirements that took effect on January 1, 2016. However, links to individual web pages showing the details of what changed from the old requirements to the new ones have been provided below.

The rank requirements in the 2016 edition of the Boy Scout Requirements book and the Boy Scout Handbook are official as of Jan. 1, 2016.

  • Scouts who joined the Boy Scouts of America on or after Jan. 1, 2016, MUST follow the rank requirements as printed in the Boy Scout Handbook or in the current year’s Boy Scout Requirements book.
  • Scouts who joined the BSA prior to Jan. 1, 2016:
    • • Who are working on the Tenderfoot through First Class ranks MAY continue to follow the old requirements, but MUST convert to the current requirements upon attaining First Class.
    • • Who have completed the First Class rank MAY complete the rank they are currently working on in the old requirements, but MUST convert to the current requirements for subsequent ranks.
  • Beginning Jan. 1, 2017, all Scouts MUST use the current requirements regardless of rank.

However, if the wording of a completed rank requirement did not change and that requirement was signed off on or prior to Dec. 31, 2016, the approval should be transferred to the corresponding new requirement.
For Tenderfoot through First Class ranks, this may include approvals that were previously listed in a different rank.
When the rank in progress has new requirements (or new elements of requirements) that were not in a previously completed rank under the previous (2015) requirements, those new requirements or elements will need to be completed in 2017 and beyond.

We have prepared a simple comparison chart showing which of the new requirements have counterparts in the old requirements. When giving credit for work done under the old requirements, Scouts and Scout Leaders should compare the wording to insure that a Scout has indeed met the full current requirement. The chart can be found by Clicking here.

The inside front Cover of the 2016 Boy Scout Requirement book contains this statement:

SCOUT IS NOW A RANK

Scout becomes a rank effective Jan. 1, 2016. All requirements for the Scout rank must be completed as a member of a troop or Varsity team. If you have already completed these requirements as part of the Webelos Scouting Adventure, simply demonstrate your knowledge or skills to your Scoutmaster or other designated leader after joining. Upon joining, a Scout must still meet the age requirements. He must be a boy who is 11 years old, or one who has completed the fifth grade or earned the Arrow of Light Award and is at least 10 years old, but is not yet 18 years old.


Scout Rank BadgeScout

The detailed changes can be seen by Clicking here.

As noted above, Scout became a rank, rather than just a patch identifying new members. The color of the Fleur-de-Lis on the Scout patch was changed from Brown to Gold. The "joining requirements" were replaced with a completely new set of requirements and footnotes. The new wording reads as follows:

All requirements for Scout rank must be completed as a member of a troop. If you already completed these requirements as part of the Webelos Scouting Adventure, simply demonstrate your knowledge or skills to your Scoutmaster or other designated leader after joining the troop.

    1. Repeat from memory the Scout Oath, Scout Law, Scout motto, and Scout slogan. In your own words, explain their meaning.
    2. Explain what Scout spirit is. Describe some ways you have shown Scout spirit by practicing the Scout Oath, Scout Law, Scout motto, and Scout slogan.
    3. Demonstrate the Boy Scout sign, salute, and handshake. Explain when they should be used.
    4. Describe the First Class Scout badge and tell what each part stands for. Explain the significance of the First Class Scout badge.
    5. Repeat from memory the Outdoor Code. In your own words, explain what the Outdoor Code means to you.
    6. Repeat from memory the Pledge of Allegiance. In your own words, explain its meaning.
  1. After attending at least one Boy Scout troop meeting, do the following:
    1. Describe how the Scouts in the troop provide its leadership.
    2. Describe the four steps of Boy Scout advancement.
    3. Describe what the Boy Scout ranks are and how they are earned.
    4. Describe what merit badges are and how they are earned.
    1. Explain the patrol method. Describe the types of patrols that are used in your troop.
    2. Become familiar with your patrol name, emblem, flag, and yell. Explain how these items create patrol spirit.
    1. Show how to tie a square knot, two half-hitches, and a taut-line hitch. Explain how each knot is used.
    2. Show the proper care of a rope by learning how to whip and fuse the ends of different kinds of rope.
  2. Demonstrate your knowledge of pocketknife safety.
  3. With your parent or guardian, complete the exercises in the pamphlet "How to Protect Your Children from Child Abuse: A Parents Guide" and earn the Cyber Chip Award for your grade. 1
  4. Since joining the troop and while working on the Scout rank, participate in a Scoutmaster conference.

Notes:

For Varsity Scouts working on Boy Scout requirements, replace "troop" with "team", and "Scoutmaster" with "Varsity Scout Coach."

The requirements for the Scout, Tenderfoot, Second Class, and First Class ranks may be worked on simultaneously; however, these ranks must be earned in sequence.

1 If your family does not have internet access at home AND you do not have ready internet access at school or another public place or via a mobile device, the Cyber Chip portion of the requirement may be waived by your Scoutmaster in consultation with your parent or guardian.


Tenderfoot Scout Rank BadgeTenderfoot

The detailed changes can be seen by Clicking here.

Substantial changes were made to the wording of all of the requirements. The requirements have been rearranged under general headings. Some new requirements were added, some requirements were moved from other ranks, and new information was added to the footnotes. The new wording reads as follows:
  • CAMPING AND OUTDOOR ETHICS
      1. Present yourself to your leader prepared for an overnight camping trip. Show the personal and camping gear you will use. Show the right way to pack and carry it.
      2. Spend at least one night on a patrol or troop campout. Sleep in a tent you have helped pitch.
      3. Tell how you practiced the Outdoor Code on a campout or outing.
  • COOKING
      1. On the campout, assist in preparing one of the meals. Tell why it is important for each patrol member to share in meal preparation and cleanup.
      2. While on a campout, demonstrate the appropriate method of safely cleaning items used to prepare, serve, and eat a meal.
      3. Explain the importance of eating together as a patrol.
  • TOOLS
      1. Demonstrate a practical use of the square knot.
      2. Demonstrate a practical use of two half-hitches.
      3. Demonstrate a practical use of the taut line hitch.
      4. Demonstrate proper care, sharpening, and use of the knife, saw, and ax. Describe when each should be used.
  • FIRST AID AND NATURE
      1. Show first aid for the following:
        • Simple cuts and scrapes
        • Blisters on the hand and foot
        • Minor (thermal/heat) burns or scalds (superficial, or first degree)
        • Bites or stings of insects or ticks
        • Venomous snakebite
        • Nosebleed
        • Frostbite and sunburn
        • Choking
      2. Describe common poisonous or hazardous plants, identify any that grow in your local area or campsite location. Tell how to treat for exposure to them.
      3. Tell what you can do on a campout or other outdoor activity to prevent or reduce the occurrence of injuries or exposure listed in Tenderfoot requirements 4a and 4b.
      4. Assemble a personal first-aid kit to carry with you on future campouts and hikes. Tell how each item in the kit would be used.
  • HIKING
      1. Explain the importance of the buddy system as it relates to your personal safety on outings and in your neighborhood. Use the buddy system while on a troop or patrol outing.
      2. Explain what to do if you become lost on a hike or campout.
      3. Explain the rules of safe hiking, both on the highway and cross-country, during the day and at night.
  • FITNESS
      1. Record your best in the following tests:
        Pushups ________ (Record the number done correctly in 60 seconds)
        Situps or curl-ups ________ (Record the number done correctly in 60 seconds)
        Back-saver sit-and-reach ________ (Record the distance stretched)
        1 mile walk/run ________ (Record the time)
      2. Develop and describe a plan for improvement in each of the activities listed in Tenderfoot requirement 6a. Keep track of your activity for at least 30 days.
      3. Show improvement (of any degree) in each activity listed in Tenderfoot requirement 6a after practicing for 30 days.
        Pushups ________ (Record the number done correctly in 60 seconds)
        Situps or curl-ups ________ (Record the number done correctly in 60 seconds)
        Back-saver sit-and-reach ________ (Record the distance stretched)
        1 mile walk/run ________ (Record the time)
  • CITIZENSHIP
      1. Demonstrate how to display, raise, lower, and fold the U.S. flag.
      2. Participate in a total of one hour of service in one or more service projects approved by your Scoutmaster. Explain how your service to others relates to the Scout slogan and Scout motto.
  • LEADERSHIP
    1. Describe the steps in Scouting's Teaching EDGE method. Use the Teaching EDGE method to teach another person how to tie the square knot.
  • SCOUT SPIRIT
    1. Demonstrate Scout spirit by living the Scout Oath and Scout Law. Tell how you have done your duty to God and how you have lived four different points of the Scout Law in your everyday life.
    2. While working toward Tenderfoot rank, and after completing Scout rank requirement 7, participate in a Scoutmaster conference.
    3. Successfully complete your board of review for the Tenderfoot rank.

Notes:

For Varsity Scouts working on Boy Scout requirements, replace "troop" with "team” and "Scoutmaster" with "Varsity Scout Coach."

The requirements for the Scout, Tenderfoot, Second Class, and First Class ranks may be worked on simultaneously; however, these ranks must be earned in sequence.

Alternate Requirements for the Tenderfoot rank are available for Scouts with physical or mental disabilities if they meet the criteria listed in the Boy Scout Requirements book.


Second Class Scout Rank BadgeSecond Class

The detailed changes can be seen by Clicking here.

Substantial changes were made to the wording of all of the requirements. The requirements have been rearranged under general headings, Some new requirements were added, some requirements were moved from other ranks, and new information was added to the footnotes. The new wording reads as follows:
  • CAMPING and OUTDOOR ETHICS
      1. Since joining, participate in five separate troop/patrol activities, three of which include overnight camping. These five activities do not include troop or patrol meetings. On at least two of the three campouts, spend the night in a tent that you pitch or other structure that you help erect (such as a lean-to, snow cave, or tepee.)
      2. Explain the principles of Leave No Trace, and tell how you practiced them while on a campout or outing. This outing must be different from the one used for Tenderfoot requirement 1c.
      3. On one of these campouts, select a location for your patrol site and recommend it to your patrol leader, senior patrol leader, or troop guide. Explain what factors you should consider when choosing a patrol site and where to pitch a tent.
  • COOKING and TOOLS
      1. Explain when it is appropriate to use a fire for cooking or other purposes and when it would not be appropriate to do so.
      2. Use the tools listed in Tenderfoot requirement 3d to prepare tinder, kindling, and fuel wood for a cooking fire.
      3. At an approved outdoor location and time, use the tinder, kindling, and fuel wood from Second Class requirement 2b to demonstrate how to build a fire. Unless prohibited by local fire restrictions, light the fire. After allowing the flames to burn safely for at least two minutes, safely extinguish the flames with minimal impact to the fire site.
      4. Explain when it is appropriate to use a lightweight stove and when it is appropriate to use a propane stove. Set up a lightweight stove or propane stove. Light the stove, unless prohibited by local fire restrictions. Describe the safety procedures for using these types of stoves.
      5. On one campout, plan and cook one hot breakfast or lunch, selecting foods from MyPlate or the current USDA nutrition model. Explain the importance of good nutrition. Demonstrate how to transport, store, and prepare the foods you selected.
      6. Demonstrate how to tie the sheet bend knot. Describe a situation in which you would use this knot.
      7. Demonstrate how to tie the bowline knot. Describe a situation in which you would use this knot.
  • NAVIGATION
      1. Demonstrate how a compass works and how to orient a map. Use a map to point out and tell the meaning of five map symbols.
      2. Using a compass and a map together, take a five-mile hike (or 10 miles by bike) approved by your adult leader and your parent or guardian.2
      3. Describe some hazards or injuries that you might encounter on your hike and what you can do to help prevent them.2
      4. Demonstrate how to find directions during the day and at night without using a compass or an electronic device.
  • NATURE
    1. Identify or show evidence of at least ten kinds of wild animals (such as birds, mammals, reptiles, fish, mollusks) found in your local area or camping location. You may show evidence by tracks, signs, or photographs you have taken.
  • AQUATICS
      1. Tell what precautions must be taken for a safe swim.
      2. Demonstrate your ability to pass the BSA beginner test. Jump feetfirst into water over your head in depth, level off and swim 25 feet on the surface, stop, turn sharply, resume swimming, then return to your starting place.
      3. Demonstrate water rescue methods by reaching with your arm or leg, by reaching with a suitable object, and by throwing lines and objects.
      4. Explain why swimming rescues should not be attempted when a reaching or throwing rescue is possible. Explain why and how a rescue swimmer should avoid contact with the victim.
  • FIRST AID
      1. Demonstrate first aid for the following:
        • Object in the eye
        • Bite of a warm blooded animal
        • Puncture wounds from a splinter, nail, and fishhook
        • Serious burns (partial thickness, or second degree)
        • Heat exhaustion
        • Shock
        • Heatstroke, dehydration, hypothermia, and hyperventilation
      2. Show what to do for "hurry" cases of stopped breathing, stroke, severe bleeding, and ingested poisoning.
      3. Tell what you can do while on a campout or hike to prevent or reduce the occurrence of the injuries listed in Second Class requirements 6a and 6b.
      4. Explain what to do in case of accidents that require emergency response in the home and the backcountry. Explain what constitutes an emergency and what information you will need to provide to a responder.
      5. Tell how you should respond if you come upon the scene of a vehicular accident.
  • FITNESS
      1. After competing Tenderfoot requirement 6c, be physically active at least 30 minutes a day for five days a week for four weeks. Keep track of your activities.
      2. Share your challenges and successes in completing Second Class requirement 7a. Set a goal for continuing to include physical activity as part of your daily life and develop a plan for doing so.
      3. Participate in a school, community, or troop program on the dangers of using drugs, alcohol, and tobacco, and other practices that could be harmful to your health. Discuss your participation in the program with your family, and explain the dangers of substance addictions. Report to your Scoutmaster or other adult leader in your troop about which parts of the Scout Oath and Law relate to what you learned.
  • CITIZENSHIP
      1. Participate in a flag ceremony for your school, religious institution, chartered organization, community, or Scouting activity.
      2. Explain what respect is due the flag of the United States.
      3. With your parents or guardian, decide on an amount of money that you would like to earn, based on the cost of a specific item you would like to purchase. Develop a plan written plan to earn the amount agreed upon and follow that plan; it is acceptable to make changes to your plan along the way. Discuss any changes made to your original plan and whether you met your goal.
      4. At a minimum of three locations, compare the cost of the item for which you are saving to determine the best place to purchase it. After completing Second Class requirement 8c, decide if you will use the amount that you earned as originally intended, save all or part of it, or use it for another purpose.
      5. Participate in two hours of service through one or more service projects approved by your Scoutmaster. Tell how your service to others relates to the Scout Oath.
  • LEADERSHIP
      1. Explain the three R's of personal safety and protection.
      2. Describe bullying; tell what the appropriate response is to one who might be bullying you or bullying another person.
  • SCOUT SPIRIT
    1. Demonstrate scout spirit by living the Scout Oath and Scout Law. Tell how you have done your duty to God and how you have lived four different points of the Scout Law (not to include those used for Tenderfoot requirement 9) in your everyday life.
    2. While working toward Second Class rank, and after completing Tenderfoot requirement 10, participate in a Scoutmaster conference.
    3. Successfully complete your board of review for the Second Class rank.

Notes:

For Varsity Scouts working on Boy Scout requirements, replace "troop" with "team” and "Scoutmaster" with "Varsity Scout Coach."

The requirements for the Scout, Tenderfoot, Second Class, and First Class ranks may be worked on simultaneously; however, these ranks must be earned in sequence.

Alternate Requirements for the Second Class rank are available for Scouts with physical or mental disabilities if they meet the criteria listed in the Boy Scout Requirements book.

2 If you use a wheelchair or crutches, or if it is difficult for you to get around, you may substitute "trip" for "hike" in requirement 3b and 3c.


First Class Scout Rank BadgeFirst Class

The detailed changes can be seen by Clicking here.

Substantial changes were made to the wording of all of the requirements. The requirements have been rearranged under general headings. Some new requirements were added, some requirements were moved from other ranks, and new information was added to the footnotes. The new wording reads as follows:
  • CAMPING and OUTDOOR ETHICS
      1. Since joining, participate in 10 separate troop/patrol activities, six of which include overnight camping. These 10 activities do not include troop or patrol meetings. On at least five of the six campouts, spend the night in a tent that you pitch or other structure that you help erect. (such as a lean-to, snow cave, or tepee.)
      2. Explain each of the principles of Tread Lightly! and tell how you practiced them while on a campout or outing. This outing must be different from the one used for Tenderfoot requirement 1c and Second Class requirement 1b.
  • COOKING
      1. Help plan a menu for one of the above campouts that includes at least one breakfast, one lunch, and one dinner and that requires cooking at least two of the meals. Tell how the menu includes the foods from MyPlate or the current USDA nutrition model and how it meets nutritional needs for the planned activity or campout.
      2. Using the menu planned in First Class requirement 2a, make a list showing a budget and food amounts needed to feed three or more boys. Secure the ingredients.
      3. Show which pans, utensils, and other gear will be needed to cook and serve these meals.
      4. Demonstrate the procedures to follow in the safe handling and storage of fresh meats, dairy products, eggs, vegetables, and other perishable food products. Show how to properly dispose of camp garbage, cans, plastic containers, and other rubbish.
      5. On one campout, serve as cook. Supervise your assistant(s) in using a stove or building a cooking fire. Prepare the breakfast, lunch, and dinner planned in First Class requirement 2a. Supervise the cleanup.
  • TOOLS
      1. Discuss when you should and should not use lashings.
      2. Demonstrate tying the timber hitch and clove hitch.
      3. Demonstrate tying the square, shear, and diagonal lashings by joining two or more poles or staves together.
      4. Use lashings to make a useful camp gadget or structure.
  • NAVIGATION
      1. Using a map and compass, complete an orienteering course that covers at least one mile and requires measuring the height and/or width of designated items (tree, tower, canyon, ditch, etc.)
      2. Demonstrate how to use a handheld GPS unit, GPS app on a smartphone or other electronic navigation system. Use a GPS to find your current location, a destination of your choice, and the route you will take to get there. Follow that route to arrive at your destination.
  • NATURE
      1. Identify or show evidence of at least 10 kinds of native plants found in your local area or campsite location. You may show evidence by fallen leaves or fallen fruit that you find in the field, or as part of a collection you have made, or by photographs you have taken.
      2. Identify two ways to obtain a weather forecast for an upcoming activity. Explain why weather forecasts are important when planning for an event.
      3. Describe at least three natural indicators of impending hazardous weather, the potential dangerous events that might result from such weather conditions, and the appropriate actions to take.
      4. Describe extreme weather conditions you might encounter in the outdoors in your local geographic area. Discuss how you would determine ahead of time the potential risk of these types of weather dangers, alternative planning considerations to avoid such risks, and how you would prepare for and respond to those weather conditions.
  • AQUATICS
      1. Successfully complete the BSA swimmer test.3
      2. Tell what precautions must be taken for a safe trip afloat.
      3. Identify the basic parts of a canoe, kayak, or other boat. Identify the parts of a paddle or an oar.
      4. Describe proper body positioning in a watercraft, depending on the type and size of the vessel. Explain the importance of proper position.
      5. With a helper and a practice victim, show a line rescue both as tender and rescuer. (The practice victim should be approximately 30 feet from shore in deep water.)
  • FIRST AID AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS
      1. Demonstrate bandages for a sprained ankle and for injuries on the head, the upper arm, and the collarbone.
      2. By yourself and with a partner, show how to:
        • Transport a person from a smoke-filled room
        • Transport for at least 25 yards a person with a sprained ankle.
      3. Tell the five most common signals of a heart attack. Explain the steps (procedures) in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).
      4. Tell what utility services exist in your home or meeting place. Describe potential hazards associated with these utilities, and tell how to respond in emergency situations.
      5. Develop an emergency action plan for your home that includes what to do in case of fire, storm, power outage, or water outage.
      6. Explain how to obtain potable water in an emergency.
  • FITNESS
      1. After completing Second Class requirement 7a, be physically active at least 30 minutes every day for five days a week for four weeks. Keep track of your activities.
      2. Share your challenges and successes in completing First Class requirement 8a. Set a goal for continuing to include physical activity as part of your daily life.
  • CITIZENSHIP
      1. Visit and discuss with a selected individual approved by your leader (for example, an elected official, judge, attorney, civil servant, principal, or teacher) the constitutional rights and obligations of a U.S. citizen.
      2. Investigate an environmental issue affecting your community. Share what you learned about that issue with your patrol or troop. Tell what, if anything, could be done by you or your community to address the concern.
      3. On a Scouting or family outing, take note of the trash and garbage you produce. Before your next similar outing, decide how you can reduce, recycle, or repurpose what you take on that outing, and then put those plans into action. Compare your results.
      4. Participate in three hours of service through one or more service projects approved by your Scoutmaster. The project(s) must not be the same service project(s) used for Tenderfoot requirement 7b and Second Class requirement 8e. Explain how your service to others relates to the Scout Law.
  • LEADERSHIP
    1. Tell someone who is eligible to join Boy Scouts, or an inactive Boy Scout, about your Scouting activities. Invite him to an outing, activity, service project or meeting. Tell him how to join, or encourage the inactive Boy Scout to become active. Share your efforts with your Scoutmaster or other adult leader.
  • SCOUT SPIRIT
    1. Demonstrate scout spirit by living the Scout Oath and Scout Law. Tell how you have done your duty to God and how you have lived four different points of the Scout Law (different from those points used for previous ranks) in your everyday life.
    2. While working toward First Class rank, and after completing Second Class requirement 11, participate in a Scoutmaster conference.
    3. Successfully complete your board of review for the First Class rank.

NOTES:

For Varsity Scouts working on Boy Scout requirements, replace "troop" with "team” and "Scoutmaster" with "Varsity Scout Coach."

The requirements for the Scout, Tenderfoot, Second Class, and First Class ranks may be worked on simultaneously; however, these ranks must be earned in sequence.

Alternate Requirements for the First Class rank are available for Scouts with physical or mental disabilities if they meet the criteria listed in the Boy Scout Requirements book.

3 See the Swimming merit badge requirements for details about the BSA Swimmer test.


Star Scout Rank BadgeStar

The detailed changes can be seen by Clicking here.

Changes were made to the wording of all of the requirements, one new requirement was added, and new information was added to the footnotes. The new wording reads as follows:
  1. Be active in your troop for at least four months as a First Class Scout.
  2. As a First Class Scout, demonstrate Scout spirit by living the Scout Oath and Scout Law. Tell how you have done your duty to God and how you have lived the Scout Oath and Scout Law in your everyday life.
  3. Earn six merit badges, including any four from the required list for Eagle. You may choose any of the 17 merit badges on the required list for Eagle to fulfill this requirement. See Eagle rank requirement 3 for this list.
    Name of Merit Badge Date Earned
    (Eagle required) _________________________ _________________________
    (Eagle required) _________________________ _________________________
    (Eagle required) _________________________ _________________________
    (Eagle required) _________________________ _________________________
    _________________________ _________________________
    _________________________ _________________________
  4. While a First Class Scout, participate in six hours of service through one or more service projects approved by your Scoutmaster.
  5. While a First Class Scout, serve actively in your troop for four months in one or more of the following positions of responsibility (or carry out a Scoutmaster assigned leadership project to help the troop):
    Boy Scout troop.
    • Patrol leader,
    • assistant senior patrol leader,
    • senior patrol leader,
    • troop guide,
    • Order of the Arrow troop representative,
    • den chief,
    • scribe,
    • librarian,
    • historian,
    • quartermaster,
    • bugler,
    • junior assistant Scoutmaster,
    • chaplain aide,
    • instructor,
    • webmaster, or
    • outdoor ethics guide 4
    Varsity Scout team.
    • Captain,
    • co-captain,
    • program manager,
    • squad leader,
    • team secretary,
    • Order of the Arrow team representative,
    • librarian,
    • historian,
    • quartermaster,
    • chaplain aide,
    • instructor,
    • den chief,
    • webmaster, or
    • outdoor ethics guide
    Venturing crew / Sea Scout ship.
    • President,
    • vice president,
    • secretary,
    • treasurer,
    • den chief,
    • quartermaster,
    • historian,
    • guide,
    • boatswain,
    • boatswain's mate,
    • yeoman,
    • purser,
    • storekeeper, or
    • webmaster,

    Lone Scout.

    Leadership responsibility in your school, religious organization, club, or elsewhere in your community.
  6. With your parent or guardian, complete the exercises in the pamphlet "How to Protect Your Children from Child Abuse: A Parents Guide" and earn the Cyber Chip Award for your grade. 5
  7. While a First Class Scout, participate in a Scoutmaster conference
  8. Successfully complete your board of review for the Star rank. 6

Notes:

For Varsity Scouts working on Boy Scout requirements, replace "troop" with "team" and "Scoutmaster" with "Varsity Scout Coach."
For Venturers working on Boy Scout requirements, replace "troop" with "crew" and "Scoutmaster" with "Crew Advisor" ot; ot; ot;
For Sea Scouts working on Boy Scout requirements, replace "troop" with "ship" and for "Scoutmaster" with "Skipper".

4 Assistant patrol leader is not an approved position of responsibility for the Star rank.

5 If your family does not have internet access at home AND you do not have ready internet access at school or another public place or via a mobile device, the Cyber Chip portion of the requirement may be waived by your Scoutmaster in consultation with your parent or guardian.

6 If the board of review does not approve the Scout's advancement, the decision may be appealed in accordance with Guide to Advancement topic 8.0.4.0.


Life Scout Rank BadgeLife

The detailed changes can be seen by Clicking here.

Changes were made to the wording of all of the requirements, and new information was added to the footnotes. The new wording reads as follows:
  1. Be active in your troop for at least six months as a Star Scout.
  2. As a Star Scout, demonstrate Scout spirit by living the Scout Oath and Scout Law. Tell how you have done your duty to God and how you have lived the Scout Law in your everyday life.
  3. Earn five more merit badges (so that you have 11 in all), including any three additional badges from the required list for Eagle.
    Name of Merit Badge Date Earned
    (Eagle required)* _________________________ _________________________
    (Eagle required)* _________________________ _________________________
    (Eagle required)* _________________________ _________________________
    _________________________ _________________________
    _________________________ _________________________

    * You may choose any of the 17 merit badges on the required list for Eagle to fulfill this requirement. See Eagle rank requirement #3 in the Eagle Scout rank requirements for this list.

  4. While a Star Scout, participate in six hours of service through one or more service projects approved by your Scoutmaster. At least 3 hours of this service must be conservation related.
  5. While a Star Scout, serve actively in your troop for six months in one or more of the following positions of responsibility (or carry out a unit leader-assigned leadership project to help the troop):
    Boy Scout troop.
    • Patrol leader,
    • assistant senior patrol leader,
    • senior patrol leader,
    • troop guide,
    • Order of the Arrow troop representative,
    • den chief,
    • scribe,
    • librarian,
    • historian,
    • quartermaster,
    • bugler,
    • junior assistant Scoutmaster,
    • chaplain aide,
    • instructor,
    • webmaster, or
    • outdoor ethics guide 7
    Varsity Scout team.
    • Captain,
    • co-captain,
    • program manager,
    • squad leader,
    • team secretary,
    • Order of the Arrow team representative,
    • librarian,
    • historian,
    • quartermaster,
    • chaplain aide,
    • instructor,
    • den chief,
    • webmaster, or
    • outdoor ethics guide
    Venturing crew / Sea Scout ship.
    • President,
    • vice president,
    • secretary,
    • treasurer,
    • den chief,
    • quartermaster,
    • historian,
    • guide,
    • boatswain,
    • boatswain's mate,
    • yeoman,
    • purser,
    • storekeeper, or
    • webmaster,

    Lone Scout.

    Leadership responsibility in your school, religious organization, club, or elsewhere in your community.
  6. While a Star Scout, use the Teaching EDGE method to teach another Scout (preferably younger than you) the skills from ONE of the following choices, so that he is prepared to pass those requirements to his Scoutmaster's satisfaction.
    1. Tenderfoot - 4a and 4b (first aid)
    2. Second Class - 2b, 2c, and 2d (cooking/camping)
    3. Second Class - 3a and 3d(navigation)
    4. First Class - 3a, 3b, 3c, and 3d (tools)
    5. First Class - 4a and 4b (navigation)
    6. Second Class - 6a and 6b (first aid)
    7. First Class - 7a and 7b (first aid)
    8. Three requirements from one of the required Eagle merit badges, as approved by your Scoutmaster.
  7. While a Star Scout, participate in a Scoutmaster conference
  8. Successfully complete your board of review for the Life rank. 8

Notes:

For Varsity Scouts working on Boy Scout requirements, replace "troop" with "team" and "Scoutmaster" with "Varsity Scout Coach."
For Venturers working on Boy Scout requirements, replace "troop" with "crew" and "Scoutmaster" with "Crew Advisor."
For Sea Scouts working on Boy Scout requirements, replace "troop" with "ship" and "Scoutmaster" with "Skipper."

7 Assistant patrol leader is not an approved position of responsibility for the Star, Life, or Eagle rank.

8 If the board of review does not approve the Scout’s advancement, the decision may be appealed in accordance with Guide to Advancement, topic 8.0.4.0.


Eagle Scout Rank BadgeEagle

The detailed changes can be seen by Clicking here.

Changes were made to the wording of all of the requirements, and new information was added to the footnotes. The new wording reads as follows:
  1. Be active in your troop for a period of at least six months as a Life Scout.
  2. As a Life Scout, demonstrate Scout spirit by living the Scout Oath and Scout Law. Tell how you have done your duty to God, how you have lived the Scout Oath and Scout Law in your everyday life, and how your understanding of the Scout Oath and Scout Law will guide your life in the future. List on your Eagle Scout Rank Application the names of individuals who know you personally and would be willing to provide a recommendation on your behalf, including parents/guardians, religious (if not affiliated with an organized religion, then the parent or guardian provides this reference), educational, employer (if employed), and two other references.
  3. Earn a total of 21 merit badges (10 more than required for the Life rank), including these 13 merit badges:
    1. First Aid
    2. Citizenship in the Community
    3. Citizenship in the Nation
    4. Citizenship in the World
    5. Communication
    6. Cooking
    7. Personal Fitness
    8. Emergency Preparedness OR Lifesaving
    9. Environmental Science OR Sustainability
    10. Personal Management
    11. Swimming OR Hiking OR Cycling
    12. Camping, and
    13. Family Life

    You must choose only one of the merit badges listed in categories h, i, and k. Any additional merit badge(s) earned in those categories may be counted as one of your eight optional merit badges used to make your total of 21.

    Name of Merit Badges Date Earned
    1. _________________________ _________________________
    2. _________________________ _________________________
    3. _________________________ _________________________
    4. _________________________ _________________________
    5. _________________________ _________________________
    6. _________________________ _________________________
    7. _________________________ _________________________
    8. _________________________ _________________________
    9. _________________________ _________________________
    10. _________________________ _________________________
  4. While a Life Scout, serve actively in your troop for six months in one or more of the following positions of responsibility:9
    Boy Scout troop.
    • Patrol leader,
    • assistant senior patrol leader,
    • senior patrol leader,
    • troop guide,
    • Order of the Arrow troop representative,
    • den chief,
    • scribe,
    • librarian,
    • historian,
    • quartermaster,
    • junior assistant Scoutmaster,
    • chaplain aide,
    • instructor,
    • webmaster, or
    • outdoor ethics guide.9
    Varsity Scout team.
    • Captain,
    • co-captain,
    • program manager,
    • squad leader,
    • team secretary,
    • Order of the Arrow team representative,
    • librarian,
    • historian
    • quartermaster,
    • chaplain aide,
    • instructor,
    • den chief.
    • webmaster, or
    • outdoor ethics guide.
    Venturing crew / Sea Scout ship.
    • President,
    • vice president,
    • secretary,
    • treasurer,
    • quartermaster
    • historian
    • den chief,
    • guide
    • boatswain,
    • boatswain's mate,
    • yeoman,
    • purser,
    • storekeeper, or
    • webmaster
    Lone Scout. Leadership responsibility in your school, religious organization, club, or elsewhere in your community.
  5. While a Life Scout, plan, develop, and give leadership to others in a service project helpful to any religious institution, any school, or your community. (The project must benefit an organization other than the Boy Scouts of America.) A project proposal must be approved by the organization benefiting from the effort, your Scoutmaster and unit committee, and the council or district before you start. You must use the Eagle Scout Service Project Workbook, BSA publication No. 512-927, in meeting this requirement. (To learn more about the Eagle Scout service project, see the Guide to Advancement, topics 9.0.2.0 through 9.0.2.15.)
  6. While a Life Scout, participate in a Scoutmaster conference.

In preparation for your board of review, prepare and attach to your Eagle Scout Rank Application a statement of your ambitions and life purpose and a listing of positions held in your religious institution, school, camp, community, or other organizations, during which you demonstrated leadership skills. Include honors and awards received during this service.

  1. Successfully complete your board of review for the Eagle Scout rank.10 (This requirement may be met after age 18 in accordance with Guide to Advancement, topic 8.0.3.1.)11

Notes:

For Varsity Scouts working on Boy Scout requirements, replace "troop" with "team" and "Scoutmaster" with "Varsity Scout Coach."
For Venturers working on Boy Scout requirements, replace "troop" with "crew" and "Scoutmaster" with "Crew Advisor."
For Sea Scouts working on Boy Scout requirements, replace "troop" with "ship" and "Scoutmaster" with "Skipper."

9 Assistant patrol leader and bugler are not approved positions of responsibility for the Eagle Scout rank. Likewise, a Scoutmaster-approved leadership project cannot be used in lieu of serving in a position of responsibility.

10 APPEALS & EXTENSIONS

If a Scout believes he has completed all requirements for the Eagle Scout rank, but is denied a board of review, he may request a board of review under disputed circumstances in accordance with Guide to Advancement, topic 8.0.3.2.

If the board of review does not approve the Scout's advancement, the decision may be appealed in accordance with Guide to Advancement, topic 8.0.4.0.

If a Scout foresees that, due to no fault or choice of his own, he will be unable to complete the Eagle Scout rank requirements before age 18, he may apply for a limited time extension in accordance with Guide to Advancement topic 9.0.4.0. Time extensions are rarely granted.


11 AGE REQUIREMENT ELIGIBILITY.

Merit badges, badges of rank, and Eagle Palms may be earned by a registered Boy Scout, Varsity Scout, or qualified Venturer or Sea Scout. He may earn these awards until his 18th birthday. Any Venturer or Sea Scout who achieved the First Class rank as a Boy Scout in a troop or Varsity Scout in a team may continue working toward the Star, Life, and Eagle Scout ranks and Eagle Palms.

An Eagle Scout board of review may occur, without special approval, within three months after the 18th birthday. Local councils must preapprove those held three to six months afterward. To initiate approval, the candidate, his parent or guardian, the unit leader, or a unit committee member attaches to the application a statement explaining the delay. Consult the Guide to Advancement, topic 8.0.3.1, in the case where a board of review is to be conducted more than six months after a candidate's 18th birthday.

If you have a permanent physical or mental disability, or a disability expected to last more than two years, or beyond age 18, you may become an Eagle Scout by qualifying for as many required merit badges as you can and qualifying for alternative merit badges for the rest. If you seek to become an Eagle Scout under this procedure, you must submit a special application to your local council service center. Your application must be approved by your council advancement committee before you can work on alternative merit badges.

A Scout or Venturer with a disability may also work toward rank advancement after he is 18 years of age if he meets the guidelines outlined in section 10 of the Guide to Advancement.


Eagle Palm PinsEagle Palms

The detailed changes can be seen by Clicking here.

Changes were made to the wording of requirements 2, 5, and 6. The new wording reads as follows:

After becoming an Eagle Scout, you may earn Palms by completing the following requirements:

  1. Be active in your troop and patrol for at least 3 months after becoming an Eagle Scout or after the award of last Palm.**
  2. Since earning the Eagle Scout rank or your last Eagle Palm, demonstrate Scout spirit by living the Scout Oath and Scout Law. Tell how you have done your duty to God and how you have lived the Scout Oath and Scout Law in your everyday life.
  3. Make a satisfactory effort to develop and demonstrate leadership ability.
  4. Earn five additional merit badges beyond those required for Eagle or last Palm.***.
  5. While an Eagle Scout participate in a Scoutmaster conference.
  6. Successfully complete your board of review for the Eagle Palm.

Notes:

*For Varsity Scouts working on Boy Scout requirements, replace "troop" with "team" and "Scoutmaster" with "Varsity Scout Coach."
For Venturers working on Boy Scout requirements, replace "troop" with "crew" and "Scoutmaster" with "Crew Advisor."
For Sea Scouts working on Boy Scout requirements, replace "troop" with "ship" and "Scoutmaster" with "Skipper."

** Eagle Palms must be earned in sequence, and the three-month tenure requirement must be observed for each Palm.

***Merit Badges earned any time since becoming a Boy Scout may be used to meet this requirement.

You may wear only the proper combination of Palms for the number of merit badges you earned beyond the rank of Eagle. The Bronze Palm represents 5 merit badges, the Gold Palm 10, and the Silver Palm 15.


REVISED Merit Badges


Cooking Merit BadgeCooking

The requirements were rearranged by subject, and renumbered and some changes to the wording were also made. Some new requirements were added, and some were dropped. The following listing shows the subjects covered by each requirement and the old and new numbering.

Old New Comment Old New Comment Old New Comment Old New Comment Old New Comment
Health and Safety Nutrition Cooking at Home Camp Cooking Trail and backpacking meals
1a 1a 2a 2a 5 4 6 5a 7 6a
1b 1b 2b 2b 5a 4a 6a 5b 7a 6b
1c 1c 2c 2c 5b 4b 6b 5c 7b 6c
1d --- dropped 2d 2d 5c 4c 6c & 6d 5d merged 7c 6d
1e 1d 3a 2e 5d 4d 6e 5e 7d --- dropped
--- 1e added 3b --- dropped 5e 4e 6f 5f 7e 6e
Cooking Basics --- 4f new 6g --- dropped Food-related Careers
4a 3a --- 5g new 8 7
4b 3b --- 5h new
4c
--- 3c new

The changes to the requirements are as follows:

Note: The meals prepared for Cooking merit badge requirements 5, 6, and 7 4, 5, and 6 will count only toward fulfilling those requirements and will not count toward rank advancement. Meals prepared for rank advancement may not count toward the Cooking merit badge. You must not repeat any menus for meals actually prepared or cooked in requirements 5, 6, and 7 4, 5, and 6.

  1. Health and Safety. Do the following:
    1. Explain to your counselor the most likely hazards you may encounter while participating in cooking activities and what you should do to anticipate, help prevent, mitigate, and respond to these hazards.
    2. Show that you know first aid for and how to prevent injuries or illnesses that could occur while preparing meals and eating, including burns and scalds, cuts, choking, and allergic reactions.
    3. Describe how meat, fish, chicken, eggs, dairy products, and fresh vegetables should be stored, transported, and properly prepared for cooking. Explain how to prevent cross-contamination.
    4. Describe the following food-related illnesses and tell what you can do to help prevent each from happening:
      1. Salmonella
      2. Staphylococcal aureus
      3. Escherichia coli (E. coli)
      4. Clostridium botulinum (Botulism)
      5. Campylobacter jejuni
      6. Hepatitis
      7. Listeria monocytogenes
      8. Cryptosporidium
      9. Norovirus
      e. Discuss with your counselor food allergies, food intolerance, and food-related illnesses and diseases, and your awareness. Explain why someone who handles or prepares food needs to be aware of these concerns.
    5. Discuss with your counselor why reading food labels is important. Explain how to identify common allergens such as peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, wheat, soy, and shellfish.
  2. Nutrition. Do the following:
    1. Using the MyPlate food guide or the current USDA nutrition model, give five examples for EACH of the following food groups, the recommended number of daily servings, and the recommended serving size:
      1. Fruits
      2. Vegetables
      3. Grains
      4. Proteins
      5. Dairy
    2. Explain why you should limit your intake of oils and sugars.
    3. Determine your daily level of activity and your caloric need based on your activity level. Then, based on the MyPlate food guide, discuss with your counselor an appropriate meal plan for yourself for one day.
    4. Discuss your current eating habits with your counselor and what you can do to eat healthier, based on the MyPlate food guide.
    5. Discuss the following food label terms: calorie, fat, saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol, sodium, carbohydrate, dietary fiber, sugar, protein. Explain how to calculate total carbohydrates and nutritional values for two servings, based on the serving size specified on the label.
  3. Do the following:
    1. Discuss the following food label terms: calorie, fat, saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol, sodium, carbohydrate, dietary fiber, sugar, protein. Explain how to calculate total carbohydrates and nutritional values for two servings, based on the serving size specified on the label.
    2. Refer to "How to Read a Food Label" in the Cooking merit badge pamphlet, and name ingredients that help the consumer identify the following allergens: peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, wheat, soy, and shellfish.
    4. Cooking Basics. Do the following:
    1. Discuss EACH of the following cooking methods. For each one, describe the equipment needed, , how temperature control is maintained, and name at least one food that can be cooked using that method: baking, boiling, broiling, pan frying, simmering, steaming, microwaving, and grilling, foil cooking, and use of a Dutch oven.
    2. Discuss the benefits of using a camp stove on an outing vs. a charcoal or wood fire.
    3. Discuss how the Outdoor Code and no-trace principles pertain to cooking in the outdoors.
      Describe with your counselor how to manage your time when preparing a meal so components for each course are ready to serve at the same time.
  4. 5. Cooking at home. Using the MyPlate food guide or the current USDA nutrition model, plan a menu for three full days of meals (three breakfasts, three lunches, and three dinners) plus one dessert. Your menu should include enough to feed yourself and at least one adult, keeping in mind any special needs (such as food allergies) of those to be served and how you kept your foods safe and free from cross-contamination. List the equipment and utensils needed to prepare and serve these meals. Then do the following:
    1. Create a shopping list for your meals showing the amount of food needed to prepare and serve each meal, and the cost for each meal.
    2. Share and discuss your meal plan and shopping list with your counselor.
    3. Using at least five of the seven 10 cooking methods from requirement 4 3, prepare and serve yourself and at least one adult (parent, family member, guardian, or other responsible adult) one breakfast, one lunch, one dinner, and one dessert from the meals you planned.*
    4. Time your cooking to have each meal ready to serve at the proper time. Have an adult verify the preparation of the meal to your counselor.
    5. After each meal, ask a person you served to evaluate the meal on presentation and taste, then evaluate your own meal. Discuss what you learned with your counselor, including any adjustments that could have improved or enhanced your meals. Tell how better planning and preparation help ensure a successful meal.
    6. Explain how you kept perishable foods safe and free from cross-contamination.
  5. 6. Using the MyPlate food guide or the current USDA nutrition model, plan a menu for your patrol or a similar size group of up to eight youth, including you) for a camping trip. Include five meals AND at least one snack OR one dessert. List the equipment and utensils needed to prepare and serve these meals. Then do the following:
    Camp cooking. Do the following:
    1. (a) Using the MyPlate food guide or the current USDA nutrition model, plan a menu for your patrol (or a similar size group of up to eight youth, including you) for a camping trip. Your menu should include enough food for each person, keeping in mind any special needs (such as food allergies) and how you keep your foods safe and free from cross-contamination. These five meals must include at least one breakfast, one lunch, one dinner, AND at least one snack OR one dessert. List the equipment and utensils needed to prepare and serve these meals.
    2. a. Create a shopping list for your meals showing the amount of food needed to prepare and serve each meal, and the cost for each meal.
    3. b. Share and discuss your meal plan and shopping list with your counselor.
    4. c. In the outdoors, using your menu plan for this requirement, cook two of the five meals you planned in requirement 6 using either a lightweight stove or a low-impact fire. Use a different cooking method from requirement 3 for each meal.** The same fireplace may be used for both meals. You must also cook a third meal using either a Dutch oven OR a foil pack OR kabobs. Serve this meal all of these meals to your patrol or a group of youth.**
      d. In the outdoors, cook one of the meals you planned in requirement 6.Use either a Dutch oven, OR a foil pack, OR kabobs. Serve this meal to your patrol or a group of youth.**
    5. In the outdoors, prepare a dessert OR a snack and serve it to your patrol or a group of youth.**
    6. After each meal, have those you served evaluate the meal on presentation and taste, and then evaluate your own meal. Discuss what you learned with your counselor, including any adjustments that could have improved or enhanced your meals. Tell how better planning and preparation help ensure successful outdoor cooking.
    7. Explain how you kept perishable foods safe and free from cross-contamination.
      Explain to your counselor how you cleaned the equipment, utensils, and the cooking site thoroughly after each meal. Explain how you properly disposed of dishwater and of all garbage.
    8. Discuss how you followed the Outdoor Code and no-trace principles when preparing your meals.
  6. 7. Using the MyPlate food guide or the current USDA nutrition model, plan a menu for trail hiking or backpacking that includes one breakfast, one lunch, one dinner, and one snack. These meals must not require refrigeration and are to be consumed by three to five people (including you). List the equipment and utensils needed to prepare and serve these meals. Then do the following:
    Trail and backpacking meals. Do the following:
    1. (a) Using the MyPlate food guide or the current USDA nutrition model, plan a menu for trail hiking or backpacking that includes one breakfast, one lunch, one dinner, and one snack. These meals must not require refrigeration and are to be consumed by three to five people (including you). Be sure to keep in mind any special needs (such as food allergies) and how you will keep your foods safe and free from cross-contamination. List the equipment and utensils needed to prepare and serve these meals.
    2. a. Create a shopping list for your meals, showing the amount of food needed to prepare and serve each meal, and the cost for each meal.
    3. b. Share and discuss your meal plan and shopping list with your counselor. Your plan must include how to repackage foods for your hike or backpacking trip to eliminate as much bulk, weight, and garbage as possible.
    4. c. While on a trail hike or backpacking trip, prepare and serve two meals and a snack from the menu planned for this requirement 7. At least one of those meals must be cooked over a fire, or an approved trail stove (with proper supervision).**
      d. For each meal prepared in requirement 7c, use safe food-handling practices. Clean up equipment, utensils, and the site thoroughly after each meal. Properly dispose of dishwater, and pack out all garbage.
    5. After each meal, have those you served evaluate the meal on presentation and taste, then evaluate your own meal. Discuss what you learned with your counselor, including any adjustments that could have improved or enhanced your meals. Tell how better planning and preparation help ensure successful trail hiking or backpacking meals.
    6. Discuss how you followed the Outdoor Code and no-trace principles during your outing. Explain to your counselor how you cleaned any equipment, utensils, and the cooking site after each meal. Explain how you properly disposed of any dishwater and packed out all garbage.
  7. 8. Food-related careers. Find out about three career opportunities in cooking. Select one and find out the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Discuss this with your counselor, and explain why this profession might interest you.

*The meals for requirement 5 4 may be prepared on different days, and they need not be prepared consecutively. The requirement calls for Scouts to plan, prepare, and serve one breakfast, one lunch, and one dinner to at least one adult; those served need not be the same for all meals.

**Where local regulations do not allow you to build a fire, the counselor may adjust the requirement to meet the law. The meals in requirements 6 and 7 5 and 6 may be prepared for different trips and need not be prepared consecutively. Scouts working on this badge in summer camp should take into consideration foods that can be obtained at the camp commissary.


Lifesaving Merit BadgeLifesaving

Most of the requirements had changes to the wording. A new requirement 2 was added, old requirement 5 was replaced with new requirement 6, old requirements 7c, 7d, and 9a were dropped, old requirement 7e was replaced with new requirement 9, and old requirements 2-4 and 6-15 were renumbered as 3-5, 7, 8, and 10-17. A note regarding requirement 15b was also added.

NOTE: Requirement 1b was inadvertently omitted from the text in the 2016 Boy Scout Requirements book.

The changes are as follows:

  1. Before doing requirements 2 through 15 17
    1. Complete Second Class requirements 8a through 8c 5a through 5d and First Class requirements 9a through 9d 6a, 6b, and 6e.
      • Second Class requirements 8a through 8c 5a through 5d:
        • (8a) (5a) Tell what precautions must be taken for a safe swim.
        • (8b) (5b) Demonstrate your ability to pass the BSA beginner test. Jump jump feetfirst into water over your head in depth, level off and swim 25 feet on the surface, stop, turn sharply, resume swimming, then return to your starting place.
        • (8c) (5c) Demonstrate water rescue methods by reaching with your arm or leg, reaching with a suitable object, and by throwing lines and objects. Explain why swimming rescues should not be attempted when a reaching or throwing rescue is possible, and explain why and how a rescue swimmer should avoid contact with the victim.
        • (5d) Explain why and how a rescue swimmer should avoid contact with the victim.
      • First Class requirements 9a through 9c 6a, 5b, and 6e:
        • (6a) Successfully complete the BSA swimmer test.
        • (9a) (6b) Tell what precautions should be taken for a safe trip afloat.
        • (9b) Successfully complete the BSA swimmer test.
        • (9c) (6e) With a helper and a practice victim, show a line rescue both as tender and as rescuer. (The practice victim should be approximately 30 feet from shore in deep water).
    2. Swim continuously for 400 yards using each of the following strokes in a strong manner for at least 50 continuous yards: front crawl, sidestroke, breaststroke, and elementary backstroke.
      NOTE: This requirement was inadvertently omitted from the text in the 2016 Boy Scout Requirements book.
  2. Discuss and review with your counselor the principles of BSA Safe Swim Defense.
  3. 2. Explain the following:
    1. Common drowning situations and how to prevent them.
    2. How to identify persons in the water who need assistance.
    3. The order of methods in water rescue.
    4. How rescue techniques vary depending on the setting and the condition of the person needing assistance.
    5. Situations for which in-water rescues should not be undertaken.
  4. 3. Demonstrate "reaching" rescues using various items such as arms, legs, arm, leg, towels, shirts, paddles, and poles.
  5. 4. Demonstrate "throwing" rescues using various items such as a line lines, ring buoys bouy, rescue bags bag, and free-floating supports support. Successfully place at least one such aid within reach of a practice victim 25 feet from shore.
    5.Show or explain the use of rowboats, canoes, and other small craft in performing rescues.
  6. With your counselor's approval, view in-person or on video a rowing rescue performed using a rowboat, canoe, kayak, or stand up paddleboard. Discuss with your counselor how effectively and efficiently the rescue was performed.
  7. 6. List various items that can be used as rescue aids in a noncontact swimming "go" rescue. Explain why buoyant aids are preferred.
  8. 7. Perform the following equipment-based Correctly demonstrate rescues for of a conscious practice subject 30 feet from shore in deep water using two types of buoyant aids provided by your counselor. Use a proper entry and a strong approach stroke. Speak to the subject to determine his condition and to provide instructions and encouragement.
    1. Present a rescue tube to the one aid to a subject, release it, and escort the victim swim at a safe distance as the subject moves to safety.
    2. Present a rescue tube to the In a separate rescue, present the other aid to a subject and use it to tow the victim subject to safety.
    3. Present a buoyant aid other than a rescue tube to the subject, release it, and escort the victim to safety.
    4. Present a buoyant aid other than a rescue tube to the subject and use it to tow the victim to safety.
    5. Remove street clothes in 20 seconds or less and use a non-buoyant aid, such as a shirt or towel, to tow the subject to safety. Explain when it is appropriate to remove heavy clothing before attempting a swimming rescue.
  9. Discuss with your counselor when it is appropriate to remove heavy clothing before attempting a swimming rescue. Remove street clothes in 20 seconds or less, enter the water, and approach a conscious practice subject 30 feet from shore in deep water. Speak to the subject and use a nonbuoyant aid, such as a shirt or towel, to tow the subject to safety.
  10. 8. Explain Discuss with your counselor the importance of avoiding contact with an active victim subject and describe demonstrate lead-and-wait tactics techniques.
  11. 9. Perform the following nonequipment rescues for a conscious practice subject 30 feet from shore. Begin in the water from a position near the subject. Speak to the subject to determine his condition and to provide instructions and encouragement.
    1. Provide a swim-along assist for a calm, responsive, tired swimmer moving with a weak forward stroke.
      b.
      Perform an armpit tow for a calm responsive, tired swimmer resting with a back float.
    2. c. Perform a cross-chest carry for an exhausted, passive victim who does not respond to instructions to aid himself responsive subject treading water.
  12. 10. In deep water, show how to escape from a victim's grasp on your wrist. Repeat for front and rear holds about the head and shoulders.
  13. 11. Perform the following rescues for an unconscious practice subject at or near the surface 30 feet from shore. Use a proper entry and strong approach stroke. Speak to the subject and splash water on him to determine his condition before making contact. Remove Quickly remove the victim from the water, with assistance if needed, and position for CPR.
    1. Perform an equipment assist using a buoyant aid.
    2. Perform a front approach and wrist tow.
    3. Perform a rear approach and armpit tow.
  14. 12. Describe Discuss with your counselor how to respond if a victim submerges before being reached by a rescuer, and do the following:
    1. Recover a 10-pound weight in 8 to 10 feet of water using a feetfirst surface dive.
    2. Repeat using a headfirst surface dive.
  15. 13. Demonstrate knowledge of resuscitation procedures:
    1. Describe how to recognize the need for rescue breathing and CPR.
    2. Demonstrate proper CPR technique for at least 3 minutes using a mannequin designed to simulate ventilations and compressions.
      Demonstrate CPR knowledge and skills, including rescue breathing, consistent with current guidelines.*
  16. 14. Demonstrate management of a spinal injury to your counselor:
    1. Explain Discuss the causes, signs, and symptoms of a spinal injury
    2. Support a face up victim subject in calm, shallow water of standing depth.
    3. Turn a subject from a facedown to a faceup position in water of standing depth while maintaining support.
  17. 15. Show that you know first aid for With your counselor, discuss causes, prevention, and treatment of other injuries or illnesses that could occur while swimming or boating, including hypothermia, heat reactions, dehydration, heat-related illnesses, muscle cramps, sunburn, stings, and hyperventilation.

* Your counselor may accept recent training in CPR by a recognized agency as completion of this requirement only if he or she feels your skills are satisfactory and need no additional reinforcement.

For more information about the BSA Swimmer test, see the Swimming merit badge requirements.


Photography Merit BadgePhotography

The requirements were substantially replaced. A new requirement 1 was added, old requirements 1 and 5 were revised and renumbered as 2 and 8, old requirement 2 was renumbered as 3, and old requirements 3 and 4 were replaced with 4, 5, 6, and 7. The changes are as follows:

  1. Safety. Do the following:
    1. Explain to your counselor the most likely hazards you may encounter while working with photography and what you should do to anticipate, mitigate, prevent, and respond to these hazards. Explain how you would prepare for exposure to environmental situations such as weather, sun, and water.
    2. Show your counselor your current, up-to-date Cyber Chip.
  2. 1. Explain how the following elements and terms can affect the quality of a picture:
    1. Light - natural light/ambient, flash natural light (ambient/existing), low light (such as at night), and artificial light (such as from a flash)
    2. Exposure-aperture (f-stops), shutter speed, depth of field ISO
    3. depth of field
    4. c. Composition-rule of thirds, leading lines, framing, depth
    5. d. Angle of view
    6. e. Stopping Stop action and blur motion
    7. Timing
  3. 2. Explain the basic parts and operation of a film camera or digital camera. Explain how an exposure is made when you take a picture.
  4. 3. Discuss with your counselor the differences between a film camera and a digital camera. Describe how computer software allows you to make adjustments to a digital photograph after it is taken.
    Do TWO of the following, then share your work with your counselor.
    1. Photograph one subject from two different angles or perspectives.
    2. Photograph one subject from two different light sources—artificial and natural.
    3. Photograph one subject with two different depth of fields.
    4. Photograph one subject with two different compositional techniques.
  5. Photograph THREE of the following, then share your work your counselor.
    1. Close-up of a person
    2. Two to three people interacting
    3. Action shot
    4. Animal shot
    5. Nature shot
    6. Picture of a person—candid, posed, or camera aware
  6. 4. Do ONE of the following:
    Describe how software allows you to enhance your photograph after it is taken. Select a photo you have taken, then do ONE of the following, and share what you have done with your counselor.
    1. Produce a picture story using the photojournalistic technique of documenting an event. Share your plan with your counselor and get your counselor's input and approval before you proceed. Then, using either a film camera or a digital camera, produce your approved picture story. Process your images and select eight to 12 images that best tell your story. Arrange your images in order, then mount the prints on a poster board. If you are using digital images, you may create a slide show on your computer or produce printouts for your poster board. Share your picture story with your counselor.
      Crop your photograph.
    2. Choose a topic that interests you to photograph for an exhibit or display. Get your counselor's approval, then photograph (digital or film) your topic. Process your images. Choose 20 of your favorite images and mount them on poster board. Share your display with your counselor. If you are using digital images, you may create a slide show on your computer or produce printouts for your poster board.
      Adjust the exposure or make a color correction.
    3. Show another way you could improve your picture for impact.
  7. Using images other than those created for requirements 4, 5 or 6, produce a visual story to document an event to photograph OR choose a topic that interests you to photograph. Do the following:
    1. Plan the images you need to photograph for your photo story.
    2. Share your plan with your counselor, and get your counselor's input and approval before you proceed.
    3. Select eight to 12 images that best tell your story. Arrange your images in order and mount the prints on a poster board, OR create an electronic presentation. Share your visual story with your counselor.
  8. 5. Discuss with your counselor the Identify three career opportunities in photography. Pick one that interests you and explain to your counselor how to prepare for such a career. Discuss with your counselor the what education and training such a career would require are required, and why this profession might interest you.

Snow Sports Merit BadgeSnow Sports

The requirements were substantially revised. A new requirement 1a was added, old requirements 1, 2, and 3 were revised and renumbered as 1b, 2a, and 2b, new requirements 3, 4, and 5 were added, old requirement 4 was revised and renumbered as 6, and old requirement 5 was renumbered as 7, had revisions to many of the requirements for the Downhill (Alpine) Skiing, Cross-Country (Nordic) Skiing, and Snowboarding options, and had a new Snowshoeing option added. The changes are as follows:

  1. Do the following:
    1. Explain to your counselor the hazards you are most likely to encounter while participating in snow sport activities, and what you should do to anticipate, help prevent, mitigate, and respond to these hazards.
    2. 1. Discuss winter sports safety, and show that you know first aid for Discuss first aid and prevention for the types of injuries or illnesses that could occur while skiing or riding participating in snow sports, including hypothermia, frostbite, shock, dehydration, sunburn, fractures, bruises, sprains, and strains. Tell how to apply splints.
  2. Do the following:
    1. 2. Explain why every skier or snowboarder snow sport participant should be prepared to render first aid in the event of an accident.
    2. 3. Explain the procedure used to report an accident to the local ski patrol for the area where you usually ski or ride, ride, or snowshoe.
  3. Explain the international trail-marking system.
  4. Discuss the importance of strength, endurance, and flexibility in snow sports. Demonstrate exercises and activities you can do to get fit for the option you choose in requirement 7.
  5. Present yourself properly clothed and equipped for the option you choose in requirement 7. Discuss how the clothing you have chosen will help keep you warm and protected.
  6. 4. Do EACH of the following:
    1. Tell the meaning of the Your Responsibility Code for skiers and snow-boarders, and snowshoers. Explain why each rider must follow this code.
    2. Explain the Smart Style safety program. Tell why it is important and how it applies to skiers and snowboarders participants at snow sport venues in terrain parks and pipes.
    3. Explain the precautions pertaining to avalanche safety, including the responsibility of individuals regarding avalanche safety.
    4. Tell the meaning of the Wilderness Use Policy. Explain why each skier and snowboarder must adopt this policy.
  7. 5. Complete all of the requirements for ONE of the following options: downhill (Alpine) skiing OR cross-country (Nordic) skiing OR snowboarding OR snowshoeing.
    • Downhill (Alpine) Skiing
      1. Show how to use and maintain your own release bindings and explain the use of two others. Explain the international DIN standard and what it means to skiers.
      2. Explain the American Teaching System and a basic snow-skiing progression.
      3. c. Name the major ski organizations in the United States and explain their functions.
        d. Discuss the five types of Alpine skis. Demonstrate two ways to carry skis and poles safely and easily.
      4. Demonstrate how to ride one kind of lift and explain how to ride two others.
        e. Explain the importance of strength, endurance, and flexibility in downhill skiing. Demonstrate exercises and activities you can do to get fit for skiing.
        f. Present yourself properly clothed and equipped for downhill skiing. Discuss how the clothing you have chosen will keep you warm and protected.
        g. Demonstrate how to ride one kind of lift and explain how to ride two others.
        h. Explain the international trail-marking system.
      5. i. On a gentle slope, demonstrate some of the beginning maneuvers learned in skiing. Include the straight run, gliding wedge, wedge stop, sidestep, and herringbone maneuvers.
      6. j. On slightly steeper terrain, show linked wedge turns.
      7. k. On a moderate slope, demonstrate five to 10 christies.
      8. l. Make a controlled run down an intermediate slope and demonstrate the following:
        1. Short-, medium-, and long-radius parallel turns
        2. A sideslip and safety (hockey) stop to each side
        3. Traverse across a slope
      9. m. Demonstrate the ability to ski in varied conditions, including changes in pitch, snow conditions, and moguls. Maintain your balance and ability to turn.
      10. Name the major ski organizations in the United States and explain their functions.
    • Cross-Country (Nordic) Skiing
      1. Show your ability to select, use, and repair, if necessary, the correct equipment for ski touring in safety and comfort.
      2. Discuss classical and telemark skis. Demonstrate two ways to carry skis and poles safely and easily.
      3. Discuss the basic principles of waxing for cross-country ski touring.
      4. Discuss the differences between cross-country skiing, ski touring, ski mountaineering, and downhill skiing.
      5. e. Explain the importance of strength, endurance, and flexibility in cross-country skiing. Demonstrate exercises and activities you can do to get fit for skiing.
        f. List the items you would take on a one-day ski tour.
      6. g. Present yourself properly clothed and equipped for a one-day ski tour. Discuss the correct use of your clothing and equipment , and how the clothing you have chosen will keep you warm and protected.
        h. Demonstrate the proper use of a topographic map and compass.
      7. i. Show a degree of stamina that will enable you to keep up with an average ski-touring group your age.
        j. On a gentle, packed slope, show some basic ways to control speed and direction. Include the straight run, traverse, sideslip side slip , step turn, wedge stop, and wedge turn maneuvers.
      8. k. On a cross-country trial (sic - should be "trail"), demonstrate effective propulsion by showing proper weight transfer form (sic - should be "from") ski to ski, pole timing, rhythm, flow, and glide.
      9. l. Demonstrate your ability, on a tour, to cope with an average variety of snow conditions.
      10. m. Demonstrate several methods of dealing with steep hills or difficult conditions. Include traverses and kick turns going uphill and downhill, sidesteps, pole drag, and ski-pole "glissade."
    • Snowboarding
      1. a. Discuss forward-fall injuries. Tell about prevention and what action must be taken in the event of any type of injury or accident.
      2. b. Do the following:
        1. Demonstrate your ability to select the correct equipment for snowboarding and to use it for safety and comfort.
        2. Present yourself properly clothed and equipped for snowboarding. Discuss how the clothing you have chosen will keep you warm and protected.
        Show your ability to select the correct equipment for snowboarding and to use it for safety and comfort.
      3. c. Show how to use and maintain your own bindings, and explain the use of the different binding methods. Explain the need for leashes.
      4. d. Discuss the four types of snowboards. Demonstrate how to carry a snowboard easily and safely.
      5. e. Demonstrate exercises and activities that will get you fit for snowboarding.
        f. Demonstrate how to ride one kind of lift and explain how to ride two others.
      6. g. Explain the international trail-marking system.
        h. Demonstrate the basic principles of waxing a snowboard.
      7. i. Do the following:
        1. On a gentle slope, demonstrate beginning snowboarding maneuvers. Show basic ways to control speed and direction. Include the sideslipping side slipping maneuver.
        2. On slightly steeper terrain, show traversing.
      8. j. On a moderate slope, demonstrate an ollie, a nose-end grab, and a wheelie.
      9. k. Make a controlled run down an intermediate slope and demonstrate the following:
        1. Skidded, carved, and jump turns
        2. Stops
        3. Riding fakie
      10. l. Demonstrate your ability to ride in varied conditions, including changes in pitch, snow conditions, and moguls. Maintain your balance and ability to turn.
      11. m. Name the major snowboarding organizations in the United States and explain their functions.
    • Snowshoeing Option
      1. Name the parts of a snowshoe.
      2. Explain how to choose the correct size of snowshoe.
      3. Describe the different types of snowshoes and their specialized uses. Discuss factors to consider when choosing a snowshoe.
      4. Explain how to properly care for and maintain snowshoes.
      5. Describe how to make an emergency snowshoe.
      6. Describe areas that are best for snowshoeing. Discuss some advantages and dangers of backcountry snowshoeing.
      7. Discuss the benefits of snowshoeing.
      8. Demonstrate the most efficient ways to break trail, climb uphill, travel downhill and traverse a slope.
      9. Take a two-mile snowshoe hike with a buddy or your troop.
      10. Demonstrate your ability, on a hike, to cope with an average variety of snow conditions.

American Business Merit BadgeAmerican Business

Requirement 2a was revised. The changes to the wording are as follows:

    1. Visit a bank or credit union. Talk with one of the officers or staff. Chart the organization of the bank financial institution. Show its relationship with other banks, business and industry.

American Labor Merit BadgeAmerican Labor

Requirement 3 was revised. The changes to the wording are as follows:

  1. Explain to your counselor what labor unions are, what they do, and what services they provide to members. In your discussion, show that you understand the concepts of labor, management, collective bargaining, negotiation, union shops, open (nonunion) shops, grievance procedures, mediation, arbitration, work stoppages, strikes, and lockouts.

Archery Merit BadgeArchery

In Requirement 5, under both OPTION A and OPTION B, requirement f(3) was revised. The changes to the wording are as follows:

  • Option A - Using a Recurve Bow or Longbow
      1. As a member of the USA Archery NAA's Junior Olympic Archery Development Program (JOAD), qualify as a Yeoman, Junior Bowman, and Bowman achieve the level of green, purple, and gray stars as part of a JOAD Club indoor or outdoor season with your chosen style of archery equipment.
  • Option B - Using a Compound Bow
      1. As a member of the USA Archery NAA's Junior Olympic Archery Development Program (JOAD), qualify as a Yeoman, Junior Bowman, and Bowman achieve the level of green, purple, and gray stars as part of a JOAD Club indoor or outdoor season with your chosen style of archery equipment.

Camping Merit BadgeCamping

Requirement 3 was revised. An added sentence in requirement 3 which correctly appears in the merit badge pamphlet and online at Scouting.org, was inadvertently omitted from the text in the 2015 edition of Boy Scout Requirements. The text was corrected in the 2016 Boy Scout Requirements book. The correct wording is as follows:

  1. Make a written plan for an overnight trek and show how to get to your camping spot using a topographical map and compass OR a topographical map and a GPS receiver. If no GPS receiver unit is available, explain how to use one to get to your camping spot.

Chemistry Merit BadgeChemistry

Requirements 1b, 1c, and 7b were revised. The changes to the wording are as follows:

    1. Describe what a material safety data sheet (MSDS) (SDS) is and tell why it is used.
    2. Obtain an (MSDS) (SDS) for both a paint and an insecticide. Compare and discuss the toxicity, disposal, and safe-handling sections for these two common household products.
    1. Using resources found at the library and in periodicals, books, and the Internet (with your parent's permission), learn about two different kinds of work done by chemists, chemical engineers, chemical technicians, or industrial chemists. For each of the four jobs positions, find out the education and training requirements.

Citizenship in the Community Merit BadgeCitizenship in the Community

Requirements 2a and 7 were revised. The changes are as follows:

    1. On a map of your community or using an electronic device, locate and point out the following:
      1. Chief government buildings such as your city hall, county courthouse, and public works/services facility
      2. Fire station, police station, and hospital nearest your home
      3. Parks, playgrounds, recreation areas, and trails
      4. 3. Historical or other interesting points of interest
  1. Do the following:
    1. Choose a Identify three charitable organization organizations outside of Scouting that interests interest you and brings bring people in your community together to work for the good of your community.
    2. Pick ONE of the organizations you chose for requirement 7a. Using a variety of resources (including newspapers, fliers and other literature, the Internet, volunteers, and employees of the organization), find out more about this organization.
    3. With your counselor's and your parent's approval, contact the organization you chose for requirement 7b and find out what young people can do to help. While working on this merit badge, volunteer at least eight hours of your time for the organization. After your volunteer experience is over, discuss what you have learned with your counselor.

Citizenship in the World Merit BadgeCitizenship in the World

Requirement 4c was revised. The changes are as follows:

    1. Select TWO of the following organizations and describe their role in the world.
      1. The United Nations and UNICEF
      2. The World Court
      3. Interpol
      4. 3. World Organization of the Scout Movement
      5. 4. The World Health Organization
      6. 5. Amnesty International
      7. 6. The International Committee of the Red Cross
      8. 7. CARE (Cooperative for American Relief Everywhere)
      9. European Union

Emergency Preparedness Merit BadgeEmergency Preparedness

Requirements 2a, 2b, 3b, 6, 7, and 8 were revised. Requirement 8b was deleted. Requirements 6a, 7, 8a, and 8b were renumbered as 8a, 7a, 7b, and 8b. The changes are as follows:

    1. Discuss with your counselor the aspects of emergency preparedness:
      1. Prepare for emergency situations
      2. Respond to emergency situations
      3. Recover from emergency situations
      4. Mitigate and prevent Prevent emergency situations
      5. Mitigate losses in emergency situations
      Include in your discussion the kinds of questions that are important to ask yourself as you consider each of these.
    2. Make a chart that demonstrates your understanding of each of the aspects of emergency preparedness in requirement 2a (prepare, respond, recover, prevent and mitigate, and prevent) with regard to 10 of the situations listed below. You must use situations 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 below in boldface but you may choose any other five listed here for a total of 10 situations. Discuss this chart with your counselor.
      1. Home kitchen fire
      2. Home basement/storage room/garage fire
      3. Explosion in the home
      4. Automobile accident
      5. Food-borne disease (food poisoning)
      6. Fire or explosion in a public place
      7. Vehicle stalled in the desert
      8. Vehicle trapped in a blizzard
      9. Flash flooding in town or in the country
      10. Mountain/backcountry accident
      11. Boating accident
      12. Gas leak in a home or a building
      13. Tornado or hurricane
      14. Major flood
      15. Toxic chemical spills and releases
      16. 15. Nuclear power plant emergency
      17. 16. Avalanche (snowslide or rockslide)
      18. 17. Violence in a public place
    1. A room structure filled with carbon monoxide
  1. Do the following:
    1. Describe the National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS)
      Tell the things a group of Scouts should be prepared to do, the training they need , and the safety precautions they should take for the following emergency services:
      1. Crowd and traffic control
      2. Messenger service and communication.
      3. Collection and distribution services.
      4. Group feeding, shelter, and sanitation.
    2. Identify the local government or community agencies that normally handle and prepare for the emergency services listed under 6a, and similar to those of the NIMS or ICS. Explain explain to your counselor how a group of Scouts could volunteer to help in the event of these types of emergencies.
      1. How the NIMS/ICS can assist a Boy Scout troop when responding in a disaster
      2. How a group of Scouts could volunteer to help in the event of these types of emergencies
    3. Find out who is your community's emergency management director and learn what this person does to prepare for, respond to, recover from, prevent, and mitigate and prevent emergency situations in your community. Discuss this information with your counselor and apply what you discover to the chart you created for requirement 2b.
  2. Take part in an emergency service project, either a real one or a practice drill, with a Scouting unit or a community agency.
    Do the following:
    1. Take part in an emergency service project, either a real one or a practice drill, with a Scouting unit or a community agency.
    2. Prepare a written plan for mobilizing your troop when needed to do emergency service. If there is already a plan, explain it. Tell your part in making it work.
  3. Do the following:
    1. Prepare a written plan for mobilizing your troop when needed to do emergency service. If there is already a plan, explain it. Tell your part in making it work.
      Tell the things a group of Scouts should be prepared to do, the training they need , and the safety precautions they should take for the following emergency services:
      1. Crowd and traffic control
      2. Messenger service and communication.
      3. Collection and distribution services.
      4. Group feeding, shelter, and sanitation.
    2. Take part in at least one troop mobilization. Before the exercise, describe your part to your counselor. Afterward, conduct an "after-action" lesson, discussing what you learned during the exercise that required changes or adjustments to the plan.
      c. Prepare a personal emergency service pack for a mobilization call. Prepare a family kit (suitcase or waterproof box) for use by your family in case an emergency evacuation is needed. Explain the needs and uses of the contents.

Environmental Science Merit BadgeEnvironmental Science

Requirements 3e2 was revised and 3g was added. The changes are as follows:

      1. Do research on one species that was endangered, or threatened, or of special concern but that which has now recovered. Find out how the organism recovered, and what its new status is. Write a 100-word report on the species and discuss it with your counselor.
    1. Pollination
      1. Using photographs or illustrations, point out the differences between a drone and a worker bee. Discuss the stages of bee development (eggs, larvae, pupae). Explain the pollination process, and what propolis is and how it is used by honey bees. Tell how bees make honey and beeswax, and how both are harvested. Explain the part played in the life of the hive by the queen, the drones, and the workers.
      2. Present to your counselor a one-page report on how and why honey bees are used in pollinating food crops. In your report, discuss the problems faced by the bee population today, and the impact to humanity if there were no pollinators. Share your report with your troop or patrol, your class at school, or another group approved by your counselor.
      3. Hive a swarm OR divide at least one colony of honey bees. Explain how a hive is constructed.

First Aid Merit BadgeFirst Aid

Requirement 2b was revised (including correction of an error in the 2015 Boy Scout Requirements book). The changes are as follows:

    1. Explain Define the term triage. Explain the steps necessary to access assess and handle a medical emergency until help arrives.

Mining in Society Merit BadgeMining in Society

In Requirement 1a an editorial error in the 2015 Boy Scout Requirements book was corrected. The change is as follows:

    1. Select 10 different materials minerals. For each one, name a product for which the mineral is used.

Personal Management Merit BadgePersonal Management

Requirements 2a, 5, and 9e were revised. The changes are as follows:

    1. Prepare a budget reflecting your expected income (allowance, gifts, wages), expenses, and savings. Track and record your actual income, expenses, and savings for 13 consecutive weeks. (You may use the forms provided in the merit badge pamphlet, devise your own, or use a computer generated version.) When complete, present the records showing the results to your merit badge counselor.
  1. Select five publicly traded stocks from the business section of the newspaper. Explain to your merit badge counselor the importance of the following information for each stock:
    1. Current price
    2. How much the price changed from the previous day
    3. The 52-week high and the 52-week low prices
    1. If necessary, develop Develop a budget for your project.

Railroading Merit BadgeRailroading

Requirements 5b and 7d were revised. The changes are as follows:

    1. Explain to your merit badge counselor why railroad safety around rights-of-way are is important for safety.
    1. Explain the use and function of the EOTD (end-of-train device) or FRED (Flashing rear end device) used on the last car of most freight trains.

Skating Merit BadgeSkating

Requirement 1 was revised, and in requirement 2 under the Ice Skating Option, requirement d2 was replaced. The changes are as follows:

  1. Do the following:
    Show that you know first aid for injuries or illnesses that may occur while skating, including hypothermia, frostbite, lacerations, abrasions, fractures, sprains and strains, blisters, heat reactions, shock, and cardiac arrest.
    1. Explain to your counselor the most likely hazards associated with skating and what you should do to anticipate, help prevent, mitigate, and respond to these hazards.
    2. Show that you know first aid for injuries or illnesses that could occur while skating, including hypothermia, frostbite, lacerations, abrasions, fractures, sprains and strains, blisters, heat-related reactions, and shock.
        1. Perform forward crossovers in a figure eight pattern.
          Explain to your counselor the safety considerations for running or participating in an ice skating race.

Forestry Merit BadgeForestry

A new merit badge pamphlet with a copyright date of 2015 was issued but the 2016 edition of Boy Scout Requirements did not include the changes listed below. A new requirement 6 was added, and requirements 6 and 7 were renumbered as 7 and 8. The changes are as follows:

  1. In your camp, local recreation area (park or equivalent), or neighborhood, inventory the trees that may be a hazard to structures or people. Make a list by area (campsite, road, trail, street, etc.). Note the species and hazardous condition, and suggest a remedy (removal or trimming). Make your list available to the proper authority or agency.
  2. 6. Do the following:
    1. Describe the consequences to forests that result from FIVE of the following elements: wildfire, absence of fire, insects, tree diseases, air pollution, overgrazing, deer or other wildlife overpopulation, improper harvest, and urbanization.
    2. Explain what can be done to reduce the consequences you discussed in 6a 7a .
    3. Describe what you should do if you discover a forest fire and how a professional firefighting crew might control it. Name your state or local wildfire control agency.
  3. 7. Visit one or more local foresters and write a brief report about the person (or persons). Or, write about a forester's occupation including the education, qualifications, career opportunities, and duties related to forestry.

Dog Care Merit BadgeDog Care

A new merit badge pamphlet with revised requirements was issued after the release of Boy Scout Requirements 2016. A new requirement 6f was added. The change is as follows:

    1. Discuss with your counselor the considerations and advantages of spaying or neutering your dog.

Hiking Merit BadgeHiking

A new merit badge pamphlet with revised requirements was issued after the release of Boy Scout Requirements 2016. The list of injuries and illnesses in requirement 1b was rearranged, requirement 2 was revised, requirements 4 and 5 were replaced with new requirement 4, requirements 6 and 7 were revised and renumbered as 5 and 6, and the footnote was revised. (There were no changes to requirements 1a and 3.) The changes are as follows:

  1. Do the following:
    1. Explain to your counselor the most likely hazards you may encounter while hiking, and what you should do to anticipate, help prevent, mitigate, and respond to these hazards.
    2. Show that you know first aid for injuries or illnesses that could occur while hiking, including hypothermia, heatstroke, heat exhaustion, frostbite, dehydration, heat exhaustion, heatstroke, sunburn, hyperventilation, altitude sickness, sprained ankle, blisters, insect stings, tick bites, and snakebite, blisters, hyperventilation, and altitude sickness.
  2. Explain and, where possible, show the points of good hiking practices. including the principles of Leave No Trace proper outdoor ethics, hiking safety in the daytime and at night, courtesy to others, choice of footwear, and proper care of feet and footwear.
  3. Explain how hiking is an aerobic activity. Develop a plan for conditioning yourself for 10-mile hikes, and describe how you will increase your fitness for longer hikes.
  4. Make a written plan for a 10-mile hike, including map routes, a clothing and equipment list, and a list of items for a trail lunch.
    Take the five following hikes, each on a different day, and each of continuous miles. These hikes MUST be taken in the following order:
    • One 5-mile hike
    • Three 10-mile hikes
    • One 15-mile hike
    You may stop for as many short rest periods as needed, as well as one meal, during each hike, but not for an extended period (example: overnight). Prepare a written hike plan before each hike and share it with your Scoutmaster or a designee. Include map routes, a clothing and equipment list, and a list of items for a trail lunch. *
  5. Take five hikes, each on a different day, and each of at least ten continuous miles. You may stop for as many short rest periods as needed, as well as one meal, during each hike, but not for an extended period (example: overnight). Prepare a hike plan for each hike.*
    6. Take a hike of 20 continuous miles in one day following a hike plan you have prepared. You may stop for as many short rest periods as needed, as well as one meal, but not for an extended period (example: overnight).*
  6. 7. After each of the hikes (or during each hike if on one continuous "trek") in requirements 5 and 6 4 and 5, write a short report reflection of your experience. Give dates and descriptions of routes covered, the weather, and any interesting things you saw. It may include something you learned about yourself, about the outdoors, or about others you were hiking with. Share this report with your merit badge counselor.
  • * The required hikes in requirements 5 and 6 can for this badge may be used in fulfilling Second Class (2a) and First Class (3) rank requirements, but only if Hiking merit badge requirements 1, 2, 3, and 4 have been completed to the satisfaction of your counselor. The hikes of requirements 5 and 6 hiking requirements for rank advancement. However, these hikes cannot be used to fulfill requirements of other merit badges.

 Traffic Safety  Merit BadgeTraffic Safety

A new merit badge pamphlet with revised requirements was issued after the release of Boy Scout Requirements 2016. There was a minor change to requirement 4b and revisions to requirements 5b and 5d. The changes are as follows:

    1. Demonstrate Describe the difference in nighttime visibility between a properly lit bicycle and rider (or a pedestrian) wearing reflective material and a bicycle and rider with no lights (or a pedestrian) dressed in dark clothing, without reflective material.
    1. Using the Internet (with your parent's permission), visit five Web sites websites that cover safe driving for teenagers. As Then in a group, discuss what you learn session with your counselor and at least three other teenagers and your counselor, discuss what you have learned..
    2. Accompanied by an adult and a buddy, pick a safe place to observe traffic at a controlled intersection (traffic signal or stop sign) on three separate days and at three different times of the day, for 30 minutes on each visit. At this intersection, survey (1) such violations as that might occur. These violations could include (but are not limited to) running a red light or stop sign ; or (2) seat belt usage , speeding, using a cell phone while driving, or occupants not wearing their seat belts. Count the number of violations or number of drivers not wearing a seat belt. Record in general terms if the driver was young or old , male or female the approximate age of the people you observed. Keep track of the total number of vehicles observed so that you can determine the percentage of compliance vs. violations. Discuss the findings with your merit badge counselor.

This analysis was prepared as a service to Scouts and Scouters nationwide
Paul S. Wolf
Secretary
US Scouting Service Project, Inc.

Printed copies of this document may be freely distributed for use in the Scouting program,
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Page updated on: September 26, 2016



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